2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 Intro and Preview

Discussion in 'Hyundai' started by xcel, May 25, 2021.

  1. litesong

    litesong litesong

    From October 11, 2021:
    Now, Volta has 2061 FREE chargers available across the country. Two of the eleven new Volta FREE chargers was just installed ONLY about 3 miles from our place. While I charge there, I can walk to the park that leads to the river at which I spent lots of time over the past 60+years. Now, I’ll have another reason to spend time on the river with my binoculars. Sssswwwweeeeeeeettt! I just went to the FREE chargers near me, AND they look great, possibly 40Amp chargers, the maximum AC charge that can be delivered to the Tesla Model 3, SR+.
    The electrical cables delivering power to cars, have nice suspension retractors, so there is no excuse to leave cables on the ground. This is one of the improvements to Volta chargers I had hoped for.
    I’m sure glad the posts from people, who are saying my enthusiasm for FREE chargers is unfounded…..ARE unfounded. Maybe, they can convince other rich EV drivers NOT to free charge & us poor people will have these Free chargers all to ourselves. That’s a joke. If rich people see poor people getting a break, rich people want the break, too. Yeah, presently 3(maybe 4?) FREE chargers in 2 locations are 3 or less miles from me.
    Did I say these were new FREE chargers? We’ll see how long it takes vandals to vandalize these new FREE chargers. Will I get an EV to charge on these new FREE chargers, before they get vandalized? The clock has started.
    Hey, I met one of the Volta maintenance people the other day at one of the Volta FREE chargers.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2021
  2. litesong

    litesong litesong

    In truth, the reduced charging rates are NOT bad. Hyundai knows that fast DC charging is hurting longevity of its battery packs. In efforts to satisfy the public demand for fast, battery-denigrating charging, Hyundai (like other manufacturers) produce EVs to accept fast charging. But also, in efforts to protect their manufactured products (& peoples’ personally owned EVs), they limit the worst battery-denigrating charging rates. Not bad strategies at all.
    As for me, I will NOT use fast, battery-denigrating chargers, which are expensive to use. I will slow charge…..which is FREE! Here I come, 500,000 miles of EV travel. Yeah, as I said in the post above, 3(maybe 4?) FREE chargers are now within 3 miles of me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2021
  3. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Litesong:

    As mentioned previously, they all ramp up to great levels for PR purposes but longevity with fast charging is the new metric. All are down to onboard charging rates by 95 percent so that is a non-issue as well. That 5 to 80 percent figure is everything for anyone on the road and without a decent curve, it turns into a negative. The VW ID4 owners with 125KW DCFC rates are envious as hell when I pull in and out in 10-minutes for 5 to 55% with the Taycan and they have 40-min to go.

    2021 Taycan EA Charging

    [​IMG]

    Wayne
     
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  4. litesong

    litesong litesong

    PR definition of longevity is NOT my definition of LONGEVITY!​
     
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  5. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Litesong:

    Not PR, actual.

    Wayne
     
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  6. litesong

    litesong litesong

    How many miles of battery life with continuous Fast Charging (including the new 800Volt chargers) would there be in the present day definition of “actual LONGEVITY”? Of course, we aren’t talking about the best battery pack LONGEVITY, but the average battery pack LONGEVITY of various brands of EVs & their battery packs, that would use DCFC.
    AND we’re NOT talking about people who are featherfooters, but average EV buyers who are getting big bangs, showing friends, relatives & neighbors the accelerations & decelerations of their new EVs, AND who may like to moto-cross. Yeah…..average people who will trade off their EVs, BEFORE their battery packs fail. Now we’re talking, “actual LONGEVITY”.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2021
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  7. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Litesong:

    Here is an ancient study. A 2% loss of cap after 50k miles between L2 and DCFC on four Leaf's with just as high of C-rates compared to some of todays DCFC'ing profiles. The LEAF's air cooled packs are nowhere near to the same tech as todays liquid cooled and controlled Li-Ion wonders.

    https://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2015/01/f19/dcfc_study_fs_50k.pdf

    Wayne
     
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  8. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Interesting. Thank you. I’m assuming the “ancient” Idaho study was conducted in Idaho(Boise?) with both the L2 slow chargers and minimal 50kW “fast” chargers? Note: the highest battery temp on DC “fast” charging, never got higher than about 105degF., even in summer, despite the use of the lower tech air cooling. Also note: the least disparate battery temperatures between L2 & minimal DCFC did occur in the summer, where the L2 battery temperatures were about 101degF. I must assume tests were conducted in “controlled” conditions & battery temperatures were never considered to be excessively high, as encountered in other US reports in so many of the Nissan Leaf “rapidgate” undue temperature rise episodes AND subsequent automatic charge-rate reductions. Such controlled tests might be considered normal for testing the Nissan battery packs’ air cooling temperatures, that are trying to match the slower speeds & drivers encountered on Japanese roads. It is also noted that “off-summer” seasons had L2 & minimal DCFC 50kW “fast” chargers vary by as much as 9degF., but usually a difference of about 7degF.
    Of course, we are NOT talking about DCFC 50kW chargers, to which the public does NOT want to be restricted. The Bjorn Nyland Hyundai Ioniq 5 & separate KIA EV6 “tests” were conducted under extreme extra “fast” charging, but those chargers are presently available to the public. They did encounter battery temperatures of 124 degF. AND the Nyland “test” was performed in Norway (& not summer?). I also believe that Nyland may NOT have been driving as fast as is his “norm”.

    Tho your given tests “only” indicate temperature differences between L2 & minimal DC “fast” charging of 4degF to 9degF, I see no reason to change my thinking that continuous use of extreme DCFC systems CANNOT provide battery pack normal longevities to 500,000 miles.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2021
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  9. BillLin

    BillLin PV solar, geothermal HVAC, hybrids and electrics

    A few comments, Litesong.

    Please get Bjorn Nyland's name right if you're going to quote his studies so much.

    Consider "C" charge rate, not just absolute charging current. The current "extremely fast" chargers aren't exceeding the C-rate as much as you indicate. e.g. 50 kW is to a 24 kW-h pack (2.1C) as 100 kW is to a 48 kW-h pack and as 208 kW is to a 100 kW-h pack. So your point is valid but only to a small degree.

    As most EV manufacturers will do, the DC charging rate tapers as the battery capacity is reached. How well or how aggressively they taper will result in different levels of "damage" to the battery. The car owner can also apply their own good sense and avoid topping off their EVs on a fast charger, regardless of the designed taper rate.

    Battery "calendar life" is a factor that I think you will have to contend with on your 500k mile EV.
     
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  10. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Well……three miles away from me! How about that. Given the US continental area & the 2061 FREE Volta chargers, I only had an average chance that a FREE Volta charger would be a radius distance from me of 15.88 miles distant, AND that 15.88 mile radius distance should be more miles to get to by road, it is very amazing that it is only 3 miles away. That the charger is a nice walk’s distance from the river I often spent time (& still do), I am flabbergasted.
    …….I gotta get an EV!!!!
     
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  11. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Thanks for the Nyland correction. :confused: I may have used Nyland somewhere, but I see I started using Hyland continuously. You just showed, that I think his wife is prettier, than his importance to EV improvement. & you are also correct that lipstick kW labels on EV chargers are not the average rate(causing damage?), but a maximum rate(really causing damage?). It is observed that L2 kW rates are NEVER anywhere close to DCFC average rates, but L2 kW rates are often what some EV drivers have never dealt with. But, as long as EV charger manufacturers pump their quick lipstick rates, I’ll use their rates. As you state, it matters not how aggressive EV manufacturers taper their rates, damage is being done. I would never depend on “driver good sense” to limit equipment damage on the fly.
    As for “calendar life”, I will contend with it, by using L2 charging, instead of DCFC. Whatever the “calendar life” is, rich EV drivers using lots of DCFC will (& are) dumping their EVs into the hands of poorer people, before “calendar life” is an issue. Rich people say, “Let poor people deal with my abuse!”
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2021
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  12. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Volt chargers now are up to 2074….still a long ways from the 3000 they hoped to have by the end of this year. I know the L2 slow FREE Volta chargers can’t be used for quick distance driving, like everyone has been telling me, especially for heavier & less efficient EVs, like the Hyundai Ioniq 5. But, if you’re laid back & living in scenic places that coincidentally have slow FREE Volta & other slow, FREE chargers near by, then leisurely lifestyles can redefine the quality of life given by slow FREE L2 charging.
    Cases in point: From my Everett, Washington area, I can readily travel to the US northern border with Canada & return home on slow FREE charging. Or traveling east to Wenatchee, Wa.(lots of FREE strong chargers), I can then travel north into the Okanogan region AND return to Everett, all on slow FREE charging. How far north of Wenatchee I would travel, defines whether I can return to Everett in one day. Getting to Spokane from Wenatchee on FREE charging is difficult, BUT may not be an impossibility, tho multi-days to do such will be needed. From Everett, I can get to Yakima on FREE charging(one of my favorite drives). Strong FREE charging is in Yakima. There is a possibility of getting from Yakima to Boise, Idaho & back to Everett on FREE charging, altho that would take maybe 3 days. From Everett, I can get to Portland, Oregon & back to Everett on slow FREE charging. That trip would be a very long day trip….or longer. & finally, slow, FREE Volta & other slow L2 chargers will get me to the Pacific Ocean & back home….FREE. AND in either of two directions! I’ll spend more time traveling to the Ocean, than I ever have before. Did I say all this travel will be FREE? Yes, I did say it’ll be FREE.
    Like on most car websites, members here CANNOT TRADE their short travel times for long times & FREE charging. As for me, I love traveling slow, interspersing car travel with walking & hiking travel. Once I get an EV, my most interesting travel times appear to be ahead of me, not behind me at my advancing age.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2021
  13. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Volta now has about 2096 chargers. Nothing special when they had hopes to have 3000 chargers by the end of 2021. More importantly, they have added EV chargers in Berlin, Germany to go with Victoria, Canada, which appears to be Volta measures to become an international consortium.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2021
  14. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Oct. 5, 2021:
    “Ha. Hahaaaa!”, says I. Since the above post, the price of the Tesla Model 3 with 7.7 kW OBC, has escalated way beyond my budget. In looking around for another EV, I found the 2022 Chevy Bolt. Cheap….at least cheaper…..actually way cheaper than the Tesla! & lo & behold, I discovered the cheap Bolt has an 11.5 kW OBC! So my chargings will gain 40+ Miles Per Hour. AND my time to enjoy the local scenery will be reduced to (555* 7.7/11.5 ) or 372 24 hour days. Still……I should be dead by the time……THAT TIME comes around. Hope I’m enjoying some local scenery when I die. The local Chevy dealer is two miles away for any servicing or repairs the Chevy Bolt will need, so I’ll have a nice walk home with 2 lakes & distant mountains to view. Maybe I’ll die on THAT walk. Nice………

    Oh, I should choose which binoculars I want to be buried with. I have many binos I USE & can’t CHOOSE. Oh, that’s right. I’m going to get cremated. Hope people after me, get as much fun from my binoculars as I did.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2021
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  15. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Tho FREE Volta chargers increase slowly, at times they plop down where I need them. I now have a line of Volta chargers from my region, all the way to Enumclaw, Washington. Topping up for FREE at Enumclaw, means an EV can now make the run up Highway 410 along the White River. Have to wait for next year, with the snow piling up now & the passes closed. But, rising further & turning right off the highway, one can drive to magnificent 6400 foot Sunrise on the northeast ridges & slopes of Mount Rainier! Or continue on the 410 up to 5500 foot Chinook Pass. Then take a long extended sweet drop all the way to Yakima on the Columbia River….. where there are more FREE chargers. Then, return to I-90, where there are more FREE chargers & back home. Sure hope I can get an EV within the year.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2021
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  16. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Litesong:

    While you continue to espouse free 3.3KW L2s, when you finally do pull the trigger, your views like the vast majority of owners will change within minutes.

    Wayne
     
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  17. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi All:

    San Diego, CA -- This morning from the Media intro, Hyundai announced the Ioniq 5 in RWD configuration arrives with an EPA range rating of 303-miles including its best-in-class, ultra-high speed charging from 10 to 80 percent in just 18 minutes. Hyundai will provide unlimited 30-minute charging sessions for two years from the date of purchase on the rapidly growing network of ultra-high speed Electrify America chargers. As mentioned previously, the IONIQ 5 goes on sale before years end. Pricing will be announced within the next 2-weeks as well.

    When equipped with a 225 HP and 258 lb-ft of torque rated single motor (RWD), the IONIQ 5’s EPA estimated driving range on a single charge is 303 miles with a 132/98/114 MPGe city/highway/combined rating. It is rated to tow 2,000 lbs.

    The EPA estimated range of the 320 hp and 446 lb-ft. of torque (combined) dual motor AWD models is 256 miles with a 110/87/98 MPGe city/highway/combined rating and capable of reaching 60 in less than 5-seconds. The AWD variant is tow rated at 1,650 lbs. Only the AWD variant includes a high efficiency heat pump.

    From the floor of the 2021 LAAS late last month, Hyundai allowed U.S. media to sit within the Ioniq 5 prototype at for the first time. And she is a beaut in no uncertain terms...

    2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

    [​IMG]

    At long last, the much-anticipated Ioniq 5 is almost here. Now scheduled for a Winter of 2021 U.S. dealership debut, from my first few seconds within, it will be a great addition to the BEV automotive landscape.

    The matte exterior finish and flush handles, upscale cloth textured headliner, and single driver and central integrated display inside add a fresh new look of the exteriors and interiors we will be driving shortly. Missing however was a sunglass holder.

    2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    27.2 cu. ft. of cargo volume behind the rear seats and 59.3 cubic feet when the second-row seats are folded. The second-row seats can slide forward up to 5.3 inches, recline, and fold in a 60:40 ratio Not much in the frunk however. ;)

    While the 106-cu. ft. rated passenger volume spec is noteworthy, knee and legroom are about on par with the award winning #Mustang #MachE. See the rear seat to my knee spacing with the front seat set for my 6' frame. The rear seats recline making for a very comfortable long-distance cruiser for those family members parked out back. Its 27.2 cu. ft. of cargo volume is about std for the small CUV segment.

    To give the interior an even greater sense of openness, IONIQ 5’s vision roof consists of one large glass panel without cross members on the high end Limited trim.

    2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Front to rear seating knee and leg room… The front seating ergonomics feel very comfortable for the short time within.​

    What I am really excited about however is its 300-mile range in FWD trim from a smallish 77.4 kWh Li-Ion battery. How did they do that? The 18-minute charge from 10 to 80% indicates 210-miles of AER added in a blink of the eye.

    Owners will be able to choose from six exterior colors, including five nature-inspired hues including Phantom Black (Pearl), Cyber Gray (Metallic), Atlas White (Solid), Digital Teal (Green Pearl), Lucid Blue (Pearl), Shooting Star (Gray Matte). The interior has three color options Obsidian Black Monotone, Dark Pebble Gray/Dove Gray, Dark Teal/Dove Gray.

    2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

    [​IMG]
    Rear seat vents in the B-Pillars are unique and the interior materials are very high end.​

    The IONIQ 5 also provides a V2L function, which allows customers to use or charge any electric devices, such as electric bicycles, scooters or camping equipment. It is ideal for powering necessities during a power outage, tailgate parties, camping or outdoor projects (1.9 kW peak power using a standard 120-volt outlet). The V2L function is enabled using an available accessory adaptor and goes into the outside charging port. In addition to outside power outlet, there is a second outlet underneath the back row seat for charging laptops, phones and other devices on the Limited trim.

    2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

    [​IMG]
    At speed.​

    The introduction of IONIQ 5 is the first step in the company's dedication to fully electric vehicles. Following the launch of IONIQ 5, Hyundai will expand its BEV lineup with IONIQ 6, a midsize electric sedan, and IONIQ 7, a large electric SUV.

    Wayne
     
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  18. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi All:

    Charging the 2022 Ioniq 5 from 9 to 80 percent in 18-minutes on a 350 KW Electrify America Charger.


    Wayne
     
  19. BillLin

    BillLin PV solar, geothermal HVAC, hybrids and electrics

    Wish Hyundai hadn't skimped on the heat pump for the RWD model.
     
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  20. litesong

    litesong litesong

    While charging, if you sat in the Ioniq 5, did you notice if the interior got warmer as the battery pack poured out waste heat?
     
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