VW September 2019 Sales down 11.8% With 26,947 Vehicles Sold

Discussion in 'In the News' started by xcel, Oct 4, 2019.

  1. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    Yep. That was the problem with the sport. I didn't like the wheels and tires at all from an economy standpoint. I liked the LX a lot. It was the best bang for the buck and Honda screwed up by offering so many features on the base model. I saw a Civic hatch and VW Sportwagen side by side at the state fair. As it happened, the honda and vw dealers had set up tents right next to each other. Both models will swallow a lot of stuff in the back but I'm getting off topic.

    The engine in the 2019 is the same one as this Jetta, the EA211 1.4 TSI. There are many similar technologies in this engine compared to the Earthdreams 1.5L turbo Civic. Both have an integrated head/exhaust manifold that's liquid cooled to extend the life of the turbocharger. Both have dual coolant circuits with dual thermostats to allow the head/exhaust manifold and block to operate at different temps. Both use very high pressure GDI with fancy firing to achieve a stratified charge. Both employ variable valve timing on intake and exhaust cams. The VW engine differs in that it uses hydraulic cam followers to automatically adjust lash while the civic still uses screw adjusters from the pleistocene era. VW uses an individual cam lobe for each valve where Honda cheaps out a bit with a single lobe and forked cam follower. Honda uses a timing chain that will lengthen over time and VW uses a belt that will need replacing eventually. When? VW claims it will last the life of the engine. haha. but they won't be pinned down as to how long that is.
     
    xcel, Carcus and BillLin like this.
  2. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    I convert manufacture 'lifetime' to 150k miles max.
     
    xcel and BillLin like this.
  3. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    Civic manual valve adjustment -- that's actually a positive in my book. Bullet proof, easy, very few tools required, .. long intervals in-between adjustments. .. or if you drive the car with a light foot, it could be a "not required"

    "maintenance free" is great ... till it ain't

    youtube:
    Volkswagen TDI cam follower failure

    Honda Civic Valve Adjustment

    /this is basically Honda vs VW: The VW drives and feels nicer off the show room floor, .. but 75, 100, 125k miles later, ... the VW ain't the same car it used to be (you may find yourself going/reaching 'deep' to bring it back). And the Honda? ... it just keeps on "ticking".
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
    xcel and BillLin like this.
  4. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    I agree. All three of my previous cars had that feature, although none of them was a Honda.
     
    xcel and BillLin like this.
  5. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    Is that a conventional dry belt, or one of the new kind that runs bathed in engine oil?
     
    xcel and BillLin like this.
  6. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    It's a dry belt. Regarding the valve adjustments with screw adjusters--I've done it once already on my Acura and it's due next year. Definitely not looking forward to it. IMO, no valve adjustments is much better than few valve adjustments--especially with screw adjusters. Screw adjusters are not bullet-proof. The lock nuts can come loose with bad consequences. Mazda, Hyundai and many others use hydraulic lash adjusters with great reliability. But replacing a cam belt is no picnic either. There would have to be an easy way to get at the belt to inspect it for it to come out ahead maintenance wise. Reliability of Honda vs VW? Honda all the way. I've never owned any VW products but there are way too many former VW owners bad-mouthing VWs to ignore.
     
    xcel and BillLin like this.
  7. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    My gen x civic maintenance minder (software driven, no miles listed) says to check the valves if they're noisy, otherwise it has you go ahead and check the valves at maintenance interval "4" which also includes spark plug change ... which I hope is around 105,000 miles ,.. which was the old number for iridium plugs. I think some older Hondas had it listed for every 30,000 miles (high(er) revving engines (?)). I was not aware that the locking mechanism on the honda screw adjusters was something to worry about, .. as long as you torque it correctly they should be good to go (?)

    /don't know the shop price but wouldn't think more than 2 hours ...
     
    xcel and BillLin like this.
  8. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    I never had one come loose in ~900k miles on three (non-Honda) cars with screw adjusters, and don't recall ever hearing before of that happening to anyone else.
     
    xcel and BillLin like this.

Share This Page