Behavior devices for insurance?

Discussion in 'General' started by uRabbit, Jul 11, 2019.

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  1. uRabbit

    uRabbit Well-Known Member

    Any thoughts on these behavior devices from insurance companies? I've read many reviews about these devices (Progressive's Snapshot device, for instance), and these devices seem to be looking at three key points:
    1. Hard-breaking
    2. Hours of drives (3 time zones of high risk, medium risk, low risk)
    3. Length of trips
    We do live in a large city, but we haven't been experiencing a ton of hard breaking, we don't drive during the high or medium risk time zones, and our length of trips are quite low, except on weekends.

    My only worry is the constant on/off of the ignition. Thoughts? Experiences?
     
  2. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    The one for Liberty Mutual also looked for heavy acceleration. Which is what you are doing with Pulse and Coast. For the best score, you pretty much have to drive the car like doing the EPA test.

    If you are talking about FAS, you aren't(or don't need to) fully shutting down the car. It's a quick switch from ON to ACC and back. The device might see that as on trip ending and another starting right away. I don't recall them showing up in the reports, but I'm rarely using advanced techniques with the car that last went through it, so may not have used any during the test period.

    The test period was 3 months, so forgoing advanced hypermiling won't hurt too much. With LM, you got at least a 5% discount for just trying it.
     
    08EscapeHybrid likes this.
  3. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    Not "heavy" cornering? I'd assume that would be prime suspect.
     
  4. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    So , Pulse and Coast is "heavy" acceleration ? Tell that to the impatient clowns behind me, lol. I accelerate with around 20 HP.
    In a 3000+ lb car , how heavy is THAT acceleration ? If I drove like the EPA does , I would get their results , lol. Except of course
    I don't have access to E0.

    With my 5AT Civic , I turned off the engine at a red light quite often.. After doing this for a year and a half , maybe two , my battery failed.
    Yes , it was five years old. But I found out that if the battery dies , and you are in Park , it's nigh impossible to get it into neutral to winch it up on a tow truck.
    If I DO get a non-hybrid car , I will think about that. But it will also be a manual.
     
  5. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    I think anything over 3.3mph/sec of the core EPA test cycles counted as heavy in regard to these programs.

    Being able to monitoring cornering would increase the price of the device. The heavy accelerating and braking is a good enough proxy for general driver behavior for the insurance companies.
     
  6. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    That's only about 0.15g, which even careful drivers might often initially hit from a standing start. I hope that limit doesn't apply at very low speeds.
     
  7. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    At lower speeds(<10-15MPH) , even in the Prius , I might exceed 3.3MPH/sec. But at least the electric assist means about 25 MPG
    during those "explosive" bursts of acceleration I call a "pulse". Yes , I am aware where my electricity comes from.
     
  8. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    Why wouldn't it? The insurance company is tracking you to get a measure of the potential risk you have of filing a claim.
    More miles driven, means more chance of an accident. Same with driving late at night.
    Heavy acceleration and hard braking are a proxy for how aggressive you drive. Or how many jerks you share the road with. Doesn't matter to the insurance company. Higher values of either mean higher risk. The outcomes will likely be less severe at lower speeds, but that doesn't change the risk of something happening.
    Or to say it another way, you can drive slow, and still be jerk.
     
  9. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    I'm wondering if that 3.3 MPH/sec is an average RATE of acceleration (not constant), from 0-35 or what ever PSL.
     
  10. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    It is the max rate in the EPA city test cycle. The highway is 3.2. Those tests are based on driving cycles from the '50s, and may have had to contend with equipment limits. The high speed and A/C test are faster
    https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/fe_test_schedules.shtml

    Either way, the app for Liberty Mutual's tracker reported I had heavy accelerations. It was the second time did the tracking, so was trying to be more mindful. Was even not pulse and coasting during it. I could recall that a hard braking event on it was from being cut off, but had trouble with IDing what it was calling a heavy acceleration. Can only deduce the limit was quite low.
     
  11. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    From a standstill, nearly any healthy car from the '50s could beat such a modest acceleration level. Otherwise, they would not have been able to climb common hills. Anyone trying to stay below that limit nowadays would be honked at by following vehicles when a stoplight turns green.
     
  12. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    Seems Nationwide's trigger acceleration rate is 7.7mph/sec.
    http://wjb-tech.blogspot.com/2015/03/nationwide-not-so-smartride.html
    From the comments, it sounds like the length of the events can be mere fraction of a second to get counted. Some one freeing there car from snow got hit with five accelerations and 4 braking events for the effort.
     
  13. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Thus telling the insurance company that you drive in snow , which is very risky.
     
  14. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    Or you drive aggressively in grid lock.

    The point is that a recorded event can be just be a tap of the pedal. You think you are braking or accelerating smoothly under their limit, but the device is polling the rate rapidly, so a spike that you didn't notice gets flagged.
     
  15. S Keith

    S Keith Well-Known Member

    My 2008 Prius average economy over the last 60 tanks is 39.5mpg.

    I couldn't afford insurance with such a device installed :)
     
  16. I looked into it for progressive. After reading all the reviews I decided not to do it. Heavy bumps or potholes set it off. Break for a deer or a kid darts out in front of you and you're a high risk driver.

    I did read that if you get an obdii splitter, plug in the device and a 9volt battery to the other side, start and drive the car around the block carefully, then remove from car but keep 9 volt battery plugged into the device, let device sit on the shelf a month, you will be classified a perfect driver. Didn't try it myself.
     
  17. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    I opted to do it because Liberty gave a 5% discount(not on the entire policy cost) to try it, and that would stay in place after regardless of results.
     
    Mendel Leisk and BillLin like this.

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