Synthetic Blend vs Full Synthetic Pro and Cons

Discussion in 'General' started by Justin23, Aug 5, 2017.

  1. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    Which one would safely extend drain intervals in relation to cost ?
     
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  2. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    That's a tough question without doing oil analysis over several oil changes of the brands you're interested in and the oil analysis increases your cost. :)

    No oil offers extended-drain benefits if you drive in a dusty environment. Dust is so abrasive and so damaging to the engine that you have to change often in that environment. So the answer is: it depends....
     
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  3. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Justin:

    The latest technology oils do a heck of a job at holding onto the dirt, cleaning, lubrication through expanded temperature ranges, and creating the highest temperature - highest sheer of any oils ever created.

    Synthetic oil molecules are more uniform in shape with fewer impurities and better properties than conventional oil molecules. In general, synthetic oil has better extreme high temperature and low temperature performance. Synthetic oils are generally formulated with higher performing additives.

    Synthetic blend motor oil uses a mixture of synthetic and conventional base oils for added resistance to oxidation (compared to conventional oil) and provide excellent low-temperature properties.

    ILSAC

    The current ILSAC GF-5 and the upcoming GF-6a or 6b standards just around the corner will be the best ever. The new Camry Hybrid uses 0W-16 which is a GF-6 oil despite the standard not being finalized by the SAE just yet.

    More on ILSAC GF-6 oil standard can be found on their website.

    ILSAC GF-6

    Getting back to your question, extended oil change intervals (OCI) is only recommended up to the manufacturer spec. Beyond that, you can have your oil tested and in most cases it is fine well beyond the OCI.

    My suggestion, coupon out either Pennzoil Ultra Platinum w/ Pureplus or Quaker State Ultimate Durability. You will receive the highest engineered oil along with the lowest kinematic viscosity providing the highest efficiency for a given weight.

    Wayne
     
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  4. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    Well the Ultra Platinum is not offered where I live but the regular Platinum is. My owners manual calls for a 7,500 interval using 10w30 conventional. I was wanting to go down to a 5w30 and extend the interval to maybe 10k. But I don't want to harm my engine in the process. I can get Quaker State / Pennzoil syn blend , Valvoline Maxlife , or Castrol Magnatec all for under $20. But I don't know which one to choose.
     
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  5. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    One reason I'm wanting to extend the interval is so I don't have to deal with waste oil as often.
     
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  6. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Justin:

    Go with full synthetic if you are going to push OCIs. Coupons also bring 5-qts. of full syn to $20 most of the time.

    Wayne
     
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  7. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    Alright. Which brand should I go with ?
     
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  8. seftonm

    seftonm Veteran Staff Member

    Blackstone Labs does lots of used oil analysis. They published an article recently that said that oil brand doesn't make a big difference

    https://www.blackstone-labs.com/Newsletters/Gas-Diesel/July-1-2017.php

     
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  9. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    That's the standard marketing b.s., much ridiculed of late by the real experts on Bob is the Oil Guy web site. (The experts there are mingled in with highly opinionated know-nothings, so you have to pay attention to know whom to believe.) Even synthetics contain a variety of molecules, none which are shaped like the lovely uniform spheres in the silly advertisements!

    Agree with most of the rest of your post.

    You can buy major-brand synthetic oils (Pennzoil, for only one example) for less than the blends if you utilize their chronic rebates.
     
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  10. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    I'm think of getting the Castrol Magnatec due to it being the cheapest full synthetic at my Walmart. They carry Quaker State Full Synthetic for less , but only in 5w20.
     
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  11. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Redylc94:

    Sorry but it is not. I have spoken with at length and worked with the expert level scientists that designed the formulations within both Pennzoil and Quaker State oils. These are the experts that were working on GF-6a and b 3+ years ago. These same scientists are the same ones that are on the SAE steering committees for the SAE oil standards and are far more credible than ANYONE on BITOG.

    Search for a non-synthetic that has as low a KV as any major brand synthetic within the same weight and specification as just one example.

    Wayne
     
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  12. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    And what would you recommend for the transmission and differential lubricant wise ?
     
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  13. ALS

    ALS Super Moderator Staff Member

    Justin23 let me chime in on one point extended oil changes. Be careful on that one if you're planning on keeping the car for a while.

    As you can see I own a third gen Prius and there was a lengthy discussion on a Prius board on higher mileage Prii having an issue with oil loss.

    A poll was done with the members concerning their oil change intervals and whether they have a oil loss issue with their car.

    Originally Toyota recommended 5K mile oil changes and a few months in after the 2010 release that OCI standard was changed to 10K mile oil changes except with severe driving conditions then 5K. I use Toyota 0W20 full synthetic in my car.

    A majority of owners who switched to the 10K oil change interval were having oil burning issues with their cars which had over 75K-80K on the odometers,

    Those who stayed with the original 5K interval, a majority were not seeing the dreaded oil burning issue.

    I have 69K miles on mine and I stayed with the original 5K or less mile OCI, my Prius burns ZERO oil between it's biannual oil changes at this point in time.

    Oil that is changed at a dealer, local garage or oil change franchise, is almost always 100% recycled, so you're really not wasting oil doing changes at the manufactures recommended intervals.

    With the transmission at least with my 97 Volvo I run Ansoil full synthetic in the transmission and rear differential. I use to use Redline but it became hard to find around me thus the switch to Ansoil. I run Mobil One 10W30 in the motor.

    The first time I drained the original "lifetime" transmission fill at 66K in my Volvo it looked like chocolate milk and smelled really bad. If you have over 50K on the clock, I would recommend a complete exchange with a full service including dropping the pan and installing a new filter if you're replacing the original transmission fill. That way you'll never have to do a full service again.

    Every two or three years I drain the pan and refill with fresh fluid. The transmission holds 10 quarts and the pan only holds 2 quarts. So it costs me about $16 in fluid every two or three years. Every time I drain the pan the fluid looks brand new. The differential should be good for a minimum of 50K or more between changes if you're using a good synthetic.


    Al
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
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  14. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    Ok. At the moment my Dodge has 88,652 miles on it and uses no oil. Plus at 7,500 miles the oil still looks new even when drained.
     
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  15. ALS

    ALS Super Moderator Staff Member

    That is good, but the oil may look new that doesn't mean everything is still fine. Oil today has an additive package that starts to break down the minute you start the engine after an oil change. It only lasts so long, be it through miles or time in the crankcase. You can only really tell is when you have an oil analysis done. You can have clean looking oil that the additive package is worn out just as you can have oil that looks dirty but still has a good bit of life left in it. The safe play is follow the manufactures recommended oil change interval and use a quality synthetic oil in the vehicle.
     
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  16. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    Ok. I just checked my local Walmart and they have Supertech Full Synthetic for $2 less than Castrol. Would it be a good choice ? I've had issues with their conventional shearing down too much.
     
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  17. Justin23

    Justin23 Member

    Or if I stick with the oem interval , would a synthetic blend be satisfactory ?
     
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  18. phoebeisis

    phoebeisis Well-Known Member

    Walmart sells extended performance-15000 miles 5 quarts Mobil One 5w30 10w30 for $28-it is a full synthetic(yeah not exactly but..)
    so why bother with the blends-
    You get a full synthetic-15000 mile interval-for just $28??
    I use 5w30 in the prius(2006 105,000 miles)
    and 10w30 in the 1998 suburban 234000 miles-
    I use the slightly heavier 10w30 because I think the suburban has some wear-and it keeps the oip pressure a couple od lbs higher 16 psi vs 18 psi once warm
    I couldn't measure a mpg difference-but wouldn't be able to measure the 1/4-1/2 a mpg improvement I would expect(NOLA is warm)
    Forget the blends-and ignore the "synthetics will make oil car leak" which might have been slightly true waaaaay back when with that Graphite oil(extremely thin base and sooty black residue made tiny leaks OBVIOUS)
    Synthetic require fewer "viscosity modifying molecules" so they have relatively more "pure lubricating molecules"
    the viscosity boosting molecules change shape when heated-increase viscosity-slow the running off of oil-
    synthetic do that without as many vis. boosters
     
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  19. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    That's my experience after doing oil analysis on my car for +100kmi and experimenting with various brands. I was a Mobil1 fanboy before I started doing oil analysis on a regular basis. In my environment (mild weather and 6 mile city commutes mostly) I found that conventional Chevron Supreme and conventional Havoline consistently gave me lower wear metals than Mobil1. Valvoline Durablend also gave me great results. So I gave up on the Mobil1 because the conventional oils were much cheaper and gave me better results. Now I live in an environment with severe winters and use the Valvoline Durablend because it has better low-temp specs than the conventional oils.
     
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  20. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    That was my thinking too. I've got an older car and live in an environment with harsh winters. I'll just use the Walmart synthetic. Then my car started leaking oil from every seal! So I went back to the Valvoline Maxlife Durablend which supposedly has more seal-swell chemistry for older cars. Eventually the leaking stopped but my car is an oily mess now.
     
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