Next-gen Samsung EV battery gets 300+ miles of range from a 20-minute charge

Discussion in 'In the News' started by ALS, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. ALS

    ALS Super Moderator Staff Member

    This folks is a major game changer when it comes to PHEV's and BEV's.

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    Samsung’s SDI battery subsidiary announced a new battery cell designed for use in electric vehicles that offers improved density to manage a max range of up to 372 miles on a full charge, with a quick charge capacity that will help it regain 310 miles or so of charge on just 20 minutes of charging. Unveiled at the North American International Auto Show for the first time, the new battery tech come with a 10 percent decrease in the number of units and weight required vs. current production battery units made by Samsung SDI.

    Full story: https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/09/n...ed&utm_campaign=Feed:+Techcrunch+(TechCrunch)
     
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  2. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    In the 2020's ...

    Seems like the automotive business , the energy business, and just about every other business will be in for a BIG transition as next gen batteries and vehicle automation get produced in mass.

    I'd normally be more skeptical, but the billions being spent 'right now' in these two fields are keeping my doubt in check.

    related: (later announcements show the Mercedes "vision van" as full EV (CES 2017))
    Mercedes-Benz unveils prototype for drone-equipped delivery van
    https://www.dezeen.com/2016/09/09/mercedes-benz-vision-van-electric-drones-automated-prototype/
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
  3. Jay

    Jay Well-Known Member

    I'm skeptical. If they've got a "major" breakthrough, why use weasel words to describe it? Why not just come out with specs like gravimetric energy density and power density, battery life, power leakage, cold and hot temp performance, cost per kwh, etc.--all the parameters that are important in automotive use?
     
  4. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    ... even the high energy density/ fast charge rate won't totally solve the EV problem. At current battery prices ($150 - $200 kwh (?)) I think these samsung batteries will work for high end cars or time share rides (where the price can be absorbed). But for competitive pricing in the "average" sedan sector I think the battery price will have to come down to under $100/kwh.

    Get that last step in line and I think it's a legitimate EV chicken** just waiting on a charging infrastructure egg.

    **$25,000 to $30,000 mid sized sedan with 110kwh battery pack, 20 minute charge time to 80%. Battery needs to last 12/150,000. At that point the pack could be replaced with a $6k-ish 50 kwh pack and the car would run out the remainder of it's life as a city commuter car.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
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  5. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

  6. thunderstruck

    thunderstruck Super Moderator

    Can't wait for a car powered by Galaxy Note 7 batteries.
     
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  7. alster

    alster Well-Known Member

    I'm skeptical of landmark battery improvements overnight. The 500 plus mile electric battery that charges in 3-5 minutes is still many years away, and with electric rates increasing it may not pencil out to be any less money per mile than liquid fuels...
     
  8. phoebeisis

    phoebeisis Well-Known Member

    A $15,000 battery-
    with $2 gas(5 cents per mile) vs 10-40(3-13 cents per mile) cents electricity
    No dollars and cents sense-yet
    Now if the electricity is from wind solar nukes or even "CO2 captured coal"
    well maybe there is a reason-
     
  9. NeilBlanchard

    NeilBlanchard Well-Known Member

    LG already is making a "238 mile" battery (which is like saying my car has a 400 mile gas tank!) already, so a 300+ mile battery is good, but not a quantum leap forward.
     
  10. Pavel4

    Pavel4 Well-Known Member

    This sounds like a good step forward but using the hackneyed phrase "game changer" is surely an over-statement.

    I pay $4 per US gallon for regular (near $5 for 94Premium). Like much of the world, battery power makes economic sense now but making larger and larger battery capacities, quicker charging times is often unnecessary. My son charges his Leaf fully over night using an ordinary 110 wall outlet - how much will the unit cost to push >100 kWh in so fast? This will make sense for full size pickups, trucks and "semis", but not so much for the city daily commuter.
     
  11. wick1ert

    wick1ert Well-Known Member

    Bet they'll make the car explosive off the line.....
     
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  12. thunderstruck

    thunderstruck Super Moderator

    When the kids say "This car is the bomb" they'll be right.
     

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