Tesla Model ☰ Reveal Tonight at 8:30 PST

Discussion in 'General' started by NeilBlanchard, Mar 31, 2016.

  1. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    Yah, I'm not saying "I" wouldn't tow with a civic or similar, either. But I'd want to understand the risks.
     
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  2. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    I put a hitch on my 89 Civic Si. I understood that Honda did not recommend doing so. I used it to move some vending machines around , one at a time on a small flat bed trailer. Total weight maybe 600 lbs. I also used it to transport a BMW R100RT I was selling ( on the same trailer). The car had plenty of power and short gearing. I don't think I'd want to do this with the Prius.
     
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  3. PaleMelanesian

    PaleMelanesian Beat the System Staff Member

    My Fit is one of the "may void warranty" ones. But its cousin from the same assembly line in Japan but shipped to Australia or Europe is approved for 500 kg = 1100 lb towing. Whatever.
     
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  4. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    We do live in the Land of Litigation.
     
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  5. PaleMelanesian

    PaleMelanesian Beat the System Staff Member

    I read an interesting analysis of that. There's more to the story, as is often true.

    In Europe, they assume towing will be done at lower speed than normal. Here in the USA the towing standards assume full speed.

    To have a stable high-speed trailer you need the weight forward of the axle. More forward = more stable at higher speed. More forward also means more tongue load on the towing vehicle. European standard is 5% tongue weight, US is 10%. Our trailers are built differently to make that happen - US trailers have the axle pushed farther back. That means the car/truck's rear axle suspension has to handle more weight. Little cars like my Fit and your Prius and old Civic just aren't built for much cargo loading.

    So, you could beef up the rear suspension, and tow. Or you could get a more balanced trailer, and tow. Or just watch your tongue loading.
     
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  6. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    I no longer have the trailer , or a real need to tow. But if I do , I will consider everything you just said. 25 yrs ago , when I did this towing , I just tried to use common sense about speeds , following distance , sufficient RPM , etc.
     
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  7. BillLin

    BillLin MASS: 2018 Bolt EV and 2017 Prime

    Great info. Thanks! Sounds like staying well under the GVWR would go a long way toward safer towing if you had to do it...
     
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  8. NeilBlanchard

    NeilBlanchard Well-Known Member

    A trailer (or a carrier) would be a good way to make a car more practical. Electric cars are great tow vehicles.
     
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  9. Prozac

    Prozac Well-Known Member

    I have a carrier for the CR-Z. I would probably only ever need to use it if I was moving to a new location. Otherwise, the hitch is great for a bike rack.
     
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  10. NeilBlanchard

    NeilBlanchard Well-Known Member

    The first production Tesla Model 3's are delivered tonight! This is The Big Day for Tesla - the Model 3 is the whole reason for the existence of Tesla.

    It may be the biggest day in automotive history?

    We have a strong hint that the Model 3 averages 237Wh/mile, which could put the range of the 60kWh battery pack at about 250 miles.
     
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  11. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    HI Neil:

    Love this news for most!

    Wayne
     
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  12. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Today , I saw a Model X. the Model S is pretty common around here , but I don't see many X's. I still love the Model S.
     
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  13. alster

    alster Well-Known Member

    So if one buys a Tesla model 3 with the 310 mile range for $44,000, can you still use Tesla's charging net work for free? Tesla has done a great job with those charging stations all across the country. As I type this less than 4 blocks from our house on Highway 101, there is a 8 place Tesla charging station, in Seaside Oregon of all places with less than 7,000 population. The only issue I have with the Tesla vehicles is where do you take them for service. Here in northwestern Oregon at least less than 12 miles from our house we have a Toyota and a Chevy Dealership where we can take our 2010 Prius and our 2016 Volt for service if needed. Where would I take a new Tesla model 3 for service or recalls if I owned one?????
     
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  14. NeilBlanchard

    NeilBlanchard Well-Known Member

    The basics:

    220 mile range on the standard battery, and a base price of $35,000.

    310 mile range on the long range battery, and a base price of $44,000.

    Going by the hint we got recently that the Model 3 averages 237Wh / mile, the battery pack capacities work out to be ~55kWh and 75kWh respectively.

    Cd is 0.23 - which is impressive; and definitely with the standard Aero wheels. Sport wheels add $1500 and increase the Cd (and cut the range, too).

    The acceleration to 60MPH is 5.5s and 5.1s respectively, and top speeds are 130MPH and 140MPH.

    Detailed specs here:

    https://electrek.co/2017/07/29/tesla-model-3-production-specs-revealed/

    First drive by Motor Trend, with pictures and video:

    http://www.motortrend.com/cars/tesla/model-3/2018/exclusive-tesla-model-3-first-drive-review/
     
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  15. Unleaded

    Unleaded Well-Known Member

    I hope to buy a Model 3 sometime in 2020.
     
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