New tire recommendation for CIVIC hybrid 2010

Discussion in 'Honda Hybrids' started by Satyem, May 31, 2014.

  1. Satyem

    Satyem Member

    Hi folks, I need to replace my car's tires and looking for some suggestions on what tires are better for hybrid cars. Do Low rolling resistance wheel really make much difference on mileage? If so, should I get the tire replaced at any Honda dealership only or any tire shop keep the LRR tires.
    Any suggestions on brand will be helpful as well?
     
  2. 08EscapeHybrid

    08EscapeHybrid Moderator

    Yes, LRR tires make a difference in hybrid mileage. You can get them at your dealer, or just about any other tire retailer.
     
  3. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 2010 Prius (CAN Touring) Staff Member

    I like Bridgestone Ecopia EP20. They're one of the OEM tires, good for rolling resistance, just don't expect any sort of traction in snow, especially once they're about half worn.

    Good prices at Costco, and once or twice a year there's an at-the-till coupon, further discounting them.
     
  4. bestmapman

    bestmapman Fighting untruth and misinformation

    I use the Hankook Optimo H426. I am on my second set now. The first set lasted me 80,000. They are on my 2010 Prius. They might work good for you.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2014
  5. Dream'R

    Dream'R Well-Known Member

    The original equipment tires on Honda Civic hybrids have been a very disappointing example of a LRR tire. They are known for short life, noise and poor traction. I recently replaced mine with Michelin Primacy MXV4s. What a terrific difference in comfort and steering response. I've had excellent experience with Michelin tires for more than 30 years, always getting very long service life and confident handling. Yes, while a true LRR tire may add a bit more MPG, there are always trade-offs in life and traction.

    My advice would to check the Tire Rack website for their research into the tires you are considering. Keep them pumped up to 35 psi minimum, rotate them regularly, learn how to exploit the IMA system in your car and enjoy many miles of safe and economical driving.

    Cheers,

    Roger
     
  6. CapriRacer

    CapriRacer Well-Known Member

    As others have alluded to, the tradeoff for fuel economy in tires is traction and/or treadwear. You need to decide what balance is right for you.

    If you were satisfied with the OE tires, go with what you know. If not, then decide how much you are willing to give up.

    And lastly, be aware that LRR is a relative term, not an absolute one. LRR means "better rolling resistance than other tires with similar treadwear and traction characteristics." It does NOT mean "Low Rolling Resistance".
     
  7. mmrmnhrm

    mmrmnhrm Well-Known Member

    Well, then!

    Except I got about 45k from my OEM tires, and efficiency immediately dropped about 20% after switching to MXV4s. Comfort and dry road response were unchanged, though wet/snow response was marginally better. Tossed EP20's on after about 60k of the Michelin's, and efficiency is moving back up, though it's hard to tell since the weather only recently got better, and I finally got a new IMA battery under warranty.
     
  8. 08EscapeHybrid

    08EscapeHybrid Moderator

    One thing you also need to remember that as the tread wears down, the tire's rolling resistance decreases. Also, brand new, never used tires have a higher RR than new ones. You need to drive about 1,000 miles on new tires before they're considered "broken in" Your immediate drop in mileage when putting new tires on was most likely the difference between old, worn tires and brand new, never used tires.
     
  9. mmrmnhrm

    mmrmnhrm Well-Known Member

  10. hunter44102

    hunter44102 Well-Known Member

    I am getting 55 MPG highway mileage right now with Michelin Defenders that have about 15k miles on them. They aren't specifically LRR tires, but they have a 'Green X' LRR rating. The tires are super quiet also and have favorable user reviews
     
  11. ksstathead

    ksstathead Moderator

    Got 65,500 out of my OEM Ecopia EP20's. Could have stretched to 75,000, but they have moved on to farm implement tire use.

    Replaced with Ecopia EP422's, which should wear longer. Happy with the way they roll so far.
     

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