Cng

Discussion in 'Emissions' started by Carcus, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    "INDIANAPOLIS — Last Wednesday, when motorists were hit with the biggest one-day jump in gasoline prices in 18 months, customers at the fueling station at Greene’s Auto & Truck Service in Indianapolis were filling their tanks for less than a dollar a gallon.

    But they were buying a different kind of gas. They were fueling up with compressed natural gas, known as CNG, a motor fuel consisting mostly of methane and made by compressing natural gas to 1 percent of its volume.

    “I spend about $12 a month on fuel,” said Joseph Cole, a 27-year-old software engineer who bought his dual-fueled 2002 Chevrolet Cavalier on eBay for $4,500. “Now that’s something you should report on.”"







    Rising demand for cheaper, cleaner fuel drives CNG
    http://heraldbulletin.com/business/x1831851139/Rising-demand-for-cheaper-cleaner-fuel-drives-CNG
     
  2. herm

    herm Well-Known Member

    a dollar a gallon is pretty impressive, and less dirt on the engine and oil.
     
  3. priusCpilot

    priusCpilot George

    I would love to put a kit on my Land Rover Defender one day!
     
  4. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

  5. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    CNG in a box

    "The CNG In A Box system’s 8 foot x 20 foot container is easy to ship and maintain due to its compact design. Its modular and novel design makes it plug-and-play on-site. Wayne, A GE Energy Business, manufactures the dispensers that deliver the CNG from the CNG In A Box system unit to vehicles. These alternative fuel dispensers feature PCI-compliant pay-at-the-pump technology for a familiar and secure fueling experience. Using the same dispenser and payment terminal interfaces as Wayne petroleum dispensers simplifies point of sale integration.

    As part of this collaboration between GE and Peake Fuel Solutions, beginning in the fall of 2012 GE will provide more than 250 CNG In A Box systems for natural gas vehicle infrastructure."

    http://www.genewscenter.com/News/GE...ch-CNG-In-A-Box-System-at-NACS-2012-3b98.aspx



    http://www.csnews.com/top-story-petroleum-ge__peake_solutions_launch_cng_in_a_box-62088.html
    GE, Peake Solutions Launch CNG In A Box
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2012
  6. herm

    herm Well-Known Member

    "The CNG In A Box system compresses natural gas from a pipeline into CNG on-site at a traditional automotive fueling station or industrial location."
     
  7. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Super Moderator Staff Member

    So it's a NG compressor-dispenser that can be found at fueling stations next to Gas In A Can and Diesel In A Cylinder.
     
  8. herm

    herm Well-Known Member

    It probably has a fairly big tank to hold a reserve of ready-to-sell CNG, and perhaps some heavy duty moisture filters. How is the sulfur contents of pipeline NG?
     
  9. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    CNG Would End US Reliance on Foreign Oil, Says Sergio Marchionne
    http://hybridcars.com/news/cng-would-end-us-reliance-foreign-oil-sergio-marchionne-58023.html


    “A rapid adoption of CNG as a fuel source for automotive applications would almost instantly kill the reliance on foreign oil, and it would bring about a substantial reduction in emissions," said Marchionne. "Those are opportunities that need to be grabbed and they need to be industrialized. Especially with large vehicles like pickups and large SUVs, we could probably accommodate the installation of CNG tanks within the next 24 to 36 months.”
     
  10. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    Especially in places like Oklahoma and Texas.

    Plan A: Where you've got the natural gas and you've got the pickups. The gas probably wouldn't end up traveling more than a few hundred miles from well to processing to vehicle.

    Plan B: Contrast that with piping NG all the way down to the coast where huge energy losses take place to convert it to diesel which is then shipped overseas. ..... Meanwhile, we import oil from overseas to convert it to gasoline to be trucked/piped back up to Oklahoma, Texas.

    The only reason to go with Plan B. is to keep the same middle man in the middle.
     
  11. herm

    herm Well-Known Member

    "The only reason to go with Plan B. is to keep the same middle man in the middle."

    Profit.. CNG is dirt cheap and low sulfur diesel is valuable. Dont forget 18 wheelers and the military run on diesel, both essential for national security, you can bet diesel exports would be stopped in a hurry during times of emergency.

    Marchionni could really help Ram to the top, Fiat has lots of experience with natural gas.. perhaps they are planning something.

    19 States convinced Dodge to offer CNG

    http://www.cleanmpg.com/forums/showthread.php?t=45243
     
  12. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

  13. herm

    herm Well-Known Member

    I think the "useful fools"environmental groups have started, complaining about NG leakage and AGW

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Useful_idiot

    "The term has been used to refer to Soviet sympathizers in Western countries. The implication was that, although the people in question naïvely thought of themselves as an ally of the Soviet Union, they were actually held in contempt and were being cynically used. The use of the term in political discourse has since been extended to other propagandists, especially those who are seen to unwittingly support a malignant cause which they naïvely believe to be a force for good.[1]"
     
  14. CRT1

    CRT1 Newbie McNewbster

    Herm, leave it to you to boil a complex topic down into a dumb-@$$ republican talking point. Was that inflammatory? :D

    Just because NG is cleaner than coal and oil, does that mean we should stick our heads in the sand about NG leakage or other environmental damage? The answer of course is NO, we should understand and responsibly mitigate and manage these contamination while tapping this resource.

    These fracking operations are the Wild West - we have no idea how much contamination is coming out of these operations in our own back yard, nor do the fracking companies for that matter because no one is collecting this data.

    This article is not worth the electrons it was written with for this very reason, we have no idea what the emissions are from these operations, so a celebratory end-zone dance is premature at best. At worst it is pro-industry propaganda.
     
  15. herm

    herm Well-Known Member

    Hey, I have to counteract Charlie with the dumb political conspiracies! :)
     
  16. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    Energy: A Methane Economy
    http://erikhare.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/energy-a-methane-economy/



    Pretty sure I'm not going to agree with everything in the author's blog -- specifically the 'GTL slant because methane's too difficult/dangerous'. Methane is not what I'd term "hard to capture and use" .. we've been doing it safely since the 40's. .......

    but, ... overall I think we're singing from the same hymnal:

    Methane looks to be the most plentiful (mined) and the easiest to produce(biogas) in a sustainable fashion.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2013
  17. herm

    herm Well-Known Member

    Surely you cant object to GTL of stranded gas?
     
  18. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    I'd much rather see NG utilized as fuel, thus bringing the price up through demand. Then it should make more sense to build the infrastructure to bring the gas to market instead of wasting 54% of the energy in a GTL conversion.

    Utilization of NG energy:
    Flaring = 0%
    GTL = 46%
    CNG to your vehicle = 95%


    Makes sense, huh?
     
  19. Carcus

    Carcus Well-Known Member

    How much gas is there in the world?

    "Analysts mostly tend to refer to proven gas reserves, i.e. volumes that have been discovered and can be produced economically with existing technology at current gas prices. Worldwide proven gas reserves are estimated at around 190 trillion cubic metres (tcm) or about 60 times current annual global gas production. However, recoverable gas resources, i.e. volumes that analysts are confident will be discovered or technology developed to produce them, are much larger, with recoverable conventional resources estimated at around 400 tcm. Recoverable unconventional resources are of a similar size. Altogether, this would last around 250 years, based on current rates of gas consumption."

    http://www.iea.org/aboutus/faqs/gas/
     
  20. CRT1

    CRT1 Newbie McNewbster

    Enough rope to hang our children with.
     

Share This Page