The Next 50 Days with the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT

Discussion in 'In the News' started by xcel, Aug 23, 2012.

  1. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    [​IMG]Beginning today, the next two months could prove to be quite interesting.

    [fimg=left]http://www.cleanmpg.com/photos/data/501/2013_Hyundai_Elantra_GT1.jpg[/fimg]Wayne Gerdes - CleanMPG - Aug 23, 2012

    The 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT starts at $18,395 while earning a 27/39 mpgUS rating with the highly recommended 6-speed manual. Picture was taken at dusk in Southern Utah.

    If you have not seen the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT announcements, previews and review, consider any of the following:

    CleanMPG Reviews the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT

    Hyundai’s Elantra Spells “Continuous Improvement”

    2013 Hyundai Elantra GT Pricing and Specifications

    2013 Hyundai Elantra GT Hatch Details Released

    Hyundai announces model year changes for 2013 Elantra

    The 2013 Elantra GT Takes The Stage at the 2012 Chicago Auto Show

    With the basics, overview and in some cases details regarding Hyundai's “Fluidic Sculptured” GT hatch posted, we are going to delve into some of the features in detail over the next 50 days. Or until I run out of highlights or have to return it back to the Chicago press fleet?

    50 Days with the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT - Day 1, Tires and Wheels

    The 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT when equipped with the $2,750 Style package arrives with some of the most unique looking 17” alloys available on any car no matter the price or segment. They are standard alloys with class exclusive chrome inserts.

    [​IMG]
    Alloy wheel with plastic chrome inserts.​

    After pulling a wheel off the car to weigh it, the chrome inserts were found to be replaceable plastic chrome pieces. They not only add a touch of “bling” to the C-Segment class but it is a light weight and replaceable solution if a wheel does get scraped or bent. Having tens of press vehicles arrive after Chicago based journalists have previously “curbed” the alloys, it is usually not a question of if but when in urban areas with curbside parking.

    [​IMG]
    Removing the wheel with the OEM jack and wrench.
    The sneaky Golden still loves to be in car pics ;)

    With the OEM low rolling resistance Hankook Optimo H426s weighing in at 20 pounds (I assume 19.5 to 20.5 pounds according to the tirerack spec), the wheel itself weighs in at approximately 23.4 pounds. When weighing the tire/alloy wheel combination by itself, the small footprint would not allow the scale to begin the process with tens of attempts properly so the 43.8 pounds shown was suspect. I weighed myself and picked up the tire/wheel combination and weighed myself again yielding the more accurate 43.4 total pounds.

    [​IMG]
    43.8 pounds on the scale.​
     
  2. bethomas463

    bethomas463 Slow Rider

    cool about the inserts. i imagine after a couple of chicago winters they would start looking pretty bad. This car is at the top of my list right now for my next one. unfortunately i dont think i will be getting out of the civic anytime in the near future (at least for next few years, ugh).
     
  3. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi All:

    50 Days with the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT - Day 2 reveals a Temporary Spare

    This is a small accolade that will hopefully never have to be used as a can of Slime or Fix-a-Flat with a portable compressor does not give me nearly the confidence of a temporary spare. Thankfully Hyundai saw to it that Elantra GT owners have a method to get down the road another 50 to 200 miles albeit at slower speeds and with less handling capability if the worst occurs out in the middle of nowhere.

    [​IMG]
    Temporary Spare​

    To be fair, the Focus hatch we drove two years back and the Mazda 3i hatch we drove earlier this year both had temporary spares as well.

    Boy do I detest inflator kits no matter how much $’s and weight they save.

    Wayne
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2012
  4. PaleMelanesian

    PaleMelanesian Beat the System Staff Member

    Good to see, and sadly rare these days.
    For my record tank I'm running light weight. Owner's manual is out, floor mats are out, even the plywood cover over the spare tire well is out, but the jack and spare are still in place. I comment Hyundai for including this despite the weight penalty.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2012
  5. priusCpilot

    priusCpilot George

    Wow hardcore!
     
  6. priusCpilot

    priusCpilot George

    Wow the wheels look very nice but they are on the heavy side. Now wondering what my 16" on my C weigh?
     
  7. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi PriusCpilot:

    Please pull one and weigh it!

    I assume you have the Bridgestone Turanza EL400-02 and according to Tire rack, they weigh in at 19 pounds. Weighing both will probably weigh in around 40 to 42 pound. We will then have weight on the steel rims.

    TIA

    Wayne
     
  8. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi All:

    A large sized area under-rear-floor storage area is standard equipment on all trims. The two compartments on the left and right of the polystyrene divider sitting directly on top of the spare wheel opening are deeper and able to handle a number of water bottles or other such items you may want to stow hidden away back there. Remember the lighter the better.

    50 Days with the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT - Day 3 reveals the under floor storage area

    [​IMG]

    If you do stow a flashlight or two back there, make sure you wrap it with a towel or something so it is not flying around beneath the storage area making a racket while you are underway.

    Wayne
     
  9. priusCpilot

    priusCpilot George


    Hey Wayne, they are the EL400-02. I was going to do the 10k service and rotation but need a better more accurate scale then what. Ill get one then post my findings.
     
  10. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi PriusCpilot:

    Great and let us know when you do.

    The 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT’s rear cargo capacity is EPA rated at 23 cu. ft. The open space useable volume beneath the top cargo cover is 44 in x 31 in x 15 in or ~ 11.8 cu. ft. There is the under floor storage area(s), the area above the top cargo cover with or without the cover removed and a number of spaces within the nooks on each side as well.

    50 Days with the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT - Day 4 and the rear hatch cargo area

    [​IMG]
    It was raining when I snapped this pic a few minutes ago.​

    A hidden 11.8 cu. ft. is fine for most grocery or department store stops and with the rear seats down… I will save that one for tomorrow’s highlight ;)

    Wayne
     
  11. bethomas463

    bethomas463 Slow Rider

    Thanks wayne both our 07 sante fe and now 11 vera cruz has hidden storage. Perfect for tie downs, bungees, rags and blanket. The sante fes was actually much larger than the cruzs but that is b/c it didbt have the third row
     
  12. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Brandon:

    I am going to try and fit my bike in the back of the Elantra GT hatch with the rear seats down to see if it will fit tomorrow? Both your Santa Fe and Veracruz would take that cargo and swallow it whole while more than likely asking for seconds ;)

    Wayne
     
  13. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi All:

    And this is where the GT hatch pays dividends big time…

    The 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT’s rear cargo capacity is EPA rated at 51 cu. ft. with the rear seats down. While getting the seats arranged into this configuration is a bit of a kludge, once setup, there is a lot of spare room back there.

    50 Days with the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT - Day 5 reveals the voluminous rear hatch

    [​IMG]
    From an empty volume to a full one, you will not be lacking space with the small on the outside but large on the inside Elantra GT.

    [​IMG]
    My 50 cm Gary Fischer, the pup and my Eureka! pack ready to hit the road.​

    If I were to break the bikes down (front wheels and seat(s) off), I could probably fit three bikes plus some day gear.

    Wayne
     
  14. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    If you don't fold the bottom cushion forward as shown, I realize the backrests wouldn't drop down to a horizontal position, but will they at least go within 30 degrees or so of horizontal, leaving space for the back of the bike tire to drop down behind the front seat? I carry a 60cm bike, sometimes two of them, and sometimes with (not easily removable) fenders. The bike position you illustrate would mangle the front fender. That folded seat cushion would be a big obstacle to carrying other large items, often worse than having the backrest tilted up somewhat (as in my hatchback).

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012
  15. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi RedylC94:

    Give me a few minutes to go out and reconfigure the Elantra GT with the lower seat cushions still in place and the seat tops down to see if it will work? The top of the rear seat does stick up quite a bit in this config. I will snap another pic when I figure out how to get the bike in there with the lower seat cushions left in their standard not-flipped-up condition.

    Wayne
     
  16. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    Thanks. It may not work in that car if the backrest won't go low enough, or if there's not enough room between front and rear seats. If it does, you need an old throw rug or some such thing to protect the upholstery at the top of the rear seatback. I've carried bikes that way for several hundred K miles
     
  17. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi RedylC94:

    I think this is what you described?

    50 Days with the 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT - Day 5 reveals the voluminous rear hatch cargo carrying capacity

    [​IMG]
    Rear hatch without lower seat cushions moved up and out with seat backs dropped for a flat floor configuration.

    [​IMG]
    My 50 cm Gary Fischer and my Eureka! pack in the same configuration as directly above.​

    I would think a rug or blanket would always be a good policy when placing a bike with sharp pedals, brake handles, shifter mechanisms and quick releases inside a car and the Elantra GT is no different. The front wheel rubbed the panoramic roof sun shade when I put it in there and I had to clean that off after I pulled my bike out.

    Wayne
     
  18. RedylC94

    RedylC94 Well-Known Member

    Sorry, I didn't explain in more detail. You have the general idea right, but it looks like the wheel didn't drop down between seats far enough to help much. I can't tell whether that's because the gap between front and rear seats is too narrow, or the wide handlebar interferes against the driver's seatback, or the rear seatback didn't go down as nearly horizontal as mine. That bike is so different from a 61cm (60 was a typo) road bike that it's hard to compare.
    Wagons and some longer hatchbacks (evidently not including the current Elantra or Accent or my car) allow carrying a complete bike without turning the front wheel sharply sideways. That's barely possible in my friend's Forester, and I think it's possible in a (non-c) Prius. Many moons ago, I once got three bikes into a hatchback Citation (which was roomier, despite its many faults).

    Thanks for trying that experiment.
     
  19. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Yup, it was roomy. My dad had the Pontiac version ; was it called Phoenix ? A nice but probably flawed car.
     
  20. bethomas463

    bethomas463 Slow Rider

    Well those were/are the wifes car. I wouldn't need something anywhere near that. Except when i am driving the boys around my civic coupe is more than fine. Just inconvienent getting the little ones in back
     

Share This Page