MPG Increase - Non-Ethanol Gas - What to Expect?

Discussion in 'Fuel Economy' started by Mightymouse13, May 9, 2012.

  1. litesong

    litesong litesong

    My objective is to get the best MPG, whether burning E0 or using E10(not burning effectively). Since I don't say I'm hypermiling, you may "hypermile" better than me.
     
  2. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    I like to get the best MPG ,too. But if it means paying 15-20% more to get a 7% improvement , I don't think so.
    It's a moot point anyway , E0 is very hard to find around here. I'm not about to take a 70 mile trip
    ( one way ) out of my way to buy a tank.
     
  3. litesong

    litesong litesong

    I like that you know that 87 octane E0 provides "7%" greater MPG than inaccurate, but "designated" 87 octane, 10% ethanol blend fuel E10. But, its not just about greater efficiency, altho gasoline engine engineers developed 87 octane gasoline engines to best use true 87 octane E0 to produce most efficient MPG results. Often reported in this website, the "ethanol in gasoline industry" has long successfully foisted off inaccurate, but "designated" 87 octane E10 on the American public, which is a combination of 114 octane AND 84 octane 100% gasoline. Also, reported on this website, the "ethanol in gasoline industry" now introduces "88 octane E15 ethanol blend. Often unknown, this concoction only has a 100% gasoline that is 83.4 octane! If the public is fooled & bribed to use cheaper & inaccurate, but "designated" 88 octane ethanol blend E15, it will be the third time the "ethanol in gasoline industry" continues its march to dilute American gasoline stocks. If 88 octane E15 is accepted by the public, "ethanol in gasoline industry" efforts to introduce inaccurate, but "designated" 87 octane ethanol blend E15 will increase. 87 octane E15 has a gasoline component of 82.3 octane.
    The "ethanol in gasoline industry" treat American drivers, as frogs in a pan of water, slowly heating up.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
  4. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    My car was made to accept E15 , but I have never seen it for sale in Illinois , and certainly wouldn't buy it.

    Many Americans are easily fooled.
     
  5. Ford Man

    Ford Man Well-Known Member

    I've got one station in my home town that sells E-0 but the price is usually at least 15% higher than other stations with E-10 (at least that's what it's advertised as). I tried it a couple of my cars a few years ago when there wasn't as much price difference and in those cars I didn't notice any significant gain in MPG. If it wasn't so much higher I'd probably use E-0 since it would probably be better on the car and I wouldn't be putting food in my gas tank. I've since bought another car so I may see how the E-0 does in it sometime.
     
  6. litesong

    litesong litesong

    ....a...a....and easily bribed (a 5 cent bribe is an easy bribe).
    "....let me try that there 88octane(gasoline component is actually 83.4 octane) 15% ethanol blend(E15). Ifn my vehicle doesn't choke, I'll buy some more".
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
    EdwinTheMagnificent likes this.
  7. litesong

    litesong litesong

    I love E0 fuel & get 8% better MPG than E10. I will pay 16% more for E0. However, the E0/E10 price gap has jumped to 20-25% more for E0. It's too much, even tho E10 gas prices in my immediate region is sky high, with much E10 gasoline selling for $3.10 to $3.40! At those prices, I would still buy E0. However, with careful scouring, I can find E10 for $2.75 on my travels to "other counties". Today, in another county, I just bought E10 for $2.56 a gallon, E0 costing 28% more! Yeah, yeah. I know Texas has E10 gas for $1.90......only 5 states away from me...... big states!
     
  8. 08EscapeHybrid

    08EscapeHybrid Moderator

    A new Sheetz fuel station was built in my town, and they sell the 88 octane E15. :(
     
  9. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Holy Sheetz ! I haven't seen E15 around here (yet). I'm hoping I never have to burn it.
     
  10. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Highlighting from my March 2019 post:
    ".....inaccurate, but "designated" 87 octane E10...... is a combination of 114 octane ethanol AND 84 octane 100% gasoline. Also, reported on this website, the "ethanol in gasoline industry" now introduces inaccurate, but "designated" 88 octane E15 ethanol blend. Often unknown, this concoction only has a...... gasoline.... (component).... that is 83.4 octane!"
    ///////
    The "ethanol in gasoline industry" has other silly ethanol blend concoctions, including even lower octane-rated gasolines to...."introduce to america".
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2019
  11. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Man, I thot I was so smart. Now, I find the gas station that sold me gas for a "low" $2.56 yesterday, is selling gas for $2.45 today. Oh, well. At least, I didn't pay $2.69 to $3.30, like many stations still charge, in my high gas price region.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2019
  12. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Got some of that there $2.45 gas today. We'll see if it costs less........ tomorrow.
     
  13. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Well........ Some days later, I got some more of that $2.45 gas. The next day, I expected the gas to go down? Well, it went up 10 cents. Yeah, I jes ken't tell where the gas price is goin'.
     
  14. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Whoa!!! Now a day later, gasoline went up another 10 cents..... at what used to be two favorite gas stations! Its funny. While prices everywhere else have been fairly stable, the two competing gas stations have been very jumpy.
     
  15. litesong

    litesong litesong

    litesong said:
    Well........ Some days later, I got some more of that $2.45 gas. The next day, I expected the gas to go down? Well, it went up 10 cents. Yeah, I jes ken't tell where the gas price is goin'.
    Now, a few days later, the gas at the "low-priced" gas stations went up 7 more cents per gallon. Yep, 27 cents in about 4 days.
     
  16. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Update since February & showing the continuing growth of E0 sources: Presently, there are 14,816 E0 sources in the U.S. & Canada. Wisconsin has 963. North Carolina has 929. Florida has 911. New York State has 992. For the first time ever, another state has passed Wisconsin in total E0 sources & it looks like New York will be the first state to 1000 E0 sources!!! Iowa presently has 346 E0 sources. I mention Iowa, because Iowa has the most corn crops that are processed to make blending ethanol to dilute our nation's gasoline stocks. Altho Iowa is dependent on ethanol blending into gasoline, there are MORE E0 sources in Iowa than Iowa has sources for E85..... by far.
     
    BillLin likes this.
  17. EdwinTheMagnificent

    EdwinTheMagnificent Legend In His Mind

    Them farmers ain't dumb. They will grow corn , but they don't wanna run their equipment on it.
     
    litesong likes this.
  18. Trollbait

    Trollbait Well-Known Member

    Thought most of their stuff runs on diesel.
    The real metric is the number of E0 stations to those selling just E10. Iowa doesn't have RFG, and isn't under more stringent emission regulations like large urban areas are.
     
  19. litesong

    litesong litesong

    The real metric is, low 87 octane, low compression ratio gasoline engines, show that E10 (only 10% ethanol added to gasoline) loses 8%, 8%, 7-8%, 7% & 5% mpg, compared to E0. Another real & true metric is: 15+(?) years ago, grassroots pure-gas.org listed only 2000 E0 sources in the U.S, & Canada, & the fed gov't, state gov'ts, & "ethanol in gasoline industry" was trying to squash that number. With no gov't or business help & lots of propaganda against E0, grassroots efforts due to need, have inspired almost 15,000 sources to offer E0 in Canada & the U.S.
     
  20. litesong

    litesong litesong

    Ethanol itself, is worthless & its 114 octane is mis-matched to 87 octane gasoline engines, unable to provide efficient power in those engines. Suspect lots of those "farmers" growing crops for ethanol production, are NOT the family farms & farmers we cherish to provide food for human beings. It is mega-corporation "farms", which make money on gov't ethanol propaganda, who don't care they help produce a worthless product.
     

Share This Page