Mercedes Astonishing MPG numbers

Discussion in 'Diesel powered automobiles' started by holew, Apr 30, 2012.

  1. holew

    holew New Member

    Mercedes offers 5 or more diesel engines for cars in the UK. Here is the MB UK website address for the C-Class autos:
    http://www2.mercedes-benz.co.uk/con...odels/c-class/_w204/facts/technical_data.html

    You will have to use the PULL DOWN to select the 220 diesel since the web address opens with the 180 gas engine and the 200 diesel already selected.

    The 220 twin turbo diesel is one of the diesels available in the UK. It is a 2148cc engine rated at 170hp. The MPG numbers for this engine in a C-Class sedan are astonishing. 47.1 mpg for the Urban Cycle (city), 68.9 mpg for the Extra Urban (highway), and 58.9 mpg combined. Additionally the performance listed is 0-62MPH = 8.1 sec with top speed 144mph.

    If these MPG numbers represent the real world I would think that MB could not keep up with demand if they were available in the USA.

    Does anyone know how reliable the European MPG posted numbers are in relation to what is actually attainable?

    Recall in the USA when the gov't first required the posting of MPG numbers the gov't mandated test resulted in overly optimistic numbers which has since been corrected.

    This is my first post on this forum. I might not know how to get back to it. So if you like you can also send me your comments at
    holew1@mac.com
    I am very interested in understanding more about the reliability of European MPG testing.
     
  2. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Holew:

    I really like your enthusiasm ;)

    Why not hang out here for a while to see what we cover and how we cover it.

    We have done stories on most of the European MB A and B class plus a number on the C's. The European NEDC is much like the old EPA. Knock off about 20% to match the current EPA and you are close. In addition, the UK uses Imperial gallons so you have to knock off another 20% on top of that to arrive at a US gallon figure.

    Next you have to consider the size of the A and B. They are way to small and with the European Super Diesels, they should do much better. Follow the Rio with the 1.1, the Ford ECOnetics with the 1.6L and the VW TDI’s with the 1.2 and 1.6L for some really cool numbers.

    And we cannot get them here due to emissions as they stand. Add that and the price goes beyond hybrid territory mighty quick.

    I hope that helps and welcome to CleanMPG!

    Wayne
     
  3. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Super Moderator Staff Member

    It's a UK site so if you haven't adjusted from Imperial gallons to US gallons divide by 1.2.
    The European NEDC tests are easier so multiply by 83% to get a rough-and-ready NEDC to EPA conversion.
    The combined figures are different in the NEDC test to: I believe it's 40/60 or 45/55 compared to the EPA 55/45 city/highway balance.

    Then, remember that the EPA cycles are tougher so meeting the emissions standard (now the same amount for particulates between EPA Tier 2 Bin 5 and Euro 6) is harder in the USA which means more aggressive emissions controls, which further hurts mileage.

    Also, I believe the diesel fuel in Europe may allow for slightly higher engine efficiency.

    (The USA has very tough NOx emissions standards but MB uses SCR so it doesn't hurt mileage although you'll pay a little extra per mile for the AdBlue urea solution (and a lot more if you're a sucker and pay the dealership for it.))

    So:
    47.1 mpg ~=> 32.6 mpg
    68.9 mpg ~=> 47.7 mpg
    So, EPA 55%/45% city/highway combined may be 38.0 mpg, but then you may expect worse because of more fuel burned for emissions reduction.
     
  4. 50 mpg by 2012

    50 mpg by 2012 Well-Known Member

    Mercedes is going to be using the 2.143 Liter twin turbo diesel with AT in a 2013 Sprinter 2500 that is reported to achieve 30 mpg(US) USER AVERAGE in mixed driving.

    I would also suggest that US USER MPG Experience Estimates for small displacement (<2 Liter) diesels at http://www.fueleconomy.gov/mpg/MPG.do?action=browseList suggest that Wayne may be overly pessimistic.

    According to SAE Technical Papers #2011-01-0618 © 2011: "Predicting Individual Fuel Economy" by Lin, Z., and Greene, D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory ... fuel frugal small displacement diesels apparently generally out perform EPA Combined sticker by 25%.

    This seem to be true for the Passat and Jetta ... BUT ... NOT the Golf for reasons not obvious to me.

    For your furter amusement, according to http://carfueldata.direct.gov.uk data, MB uses the 2.143 L diesel in about 68% of their diesel light passenger vehicle offerings (with various calibrations, some frugal and some not).

    This engine was first introduced in 2008 ... iirc.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2012

Share This Page