MTs little courier pickup

Discussion in 'My Ride' started by MT bucket, May 14, 2009.

  1. Right Lane Cruiser

    Right Lane Cruiser Penguin of Notagascar

    Michael, an electronic timer works nicely for me. I picked up one for a reasonable price over at Walmart. ;)
     
  2. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    Good idea Sean! :thumbs_up: thanks for the tip
     
  3. mcmurphy

    mcmurphy Active Member

    I don't really know anything about EBH's so any information that could be passed along would be great. I live in Buffalo so it would definitely get use through roughly half the year! I drive an 02 Olds Alero GX 4spAT if that info is needed.
     
  4. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    I don't know too much, it worked good for me in my previous vehicle, my coolant would be up around 50 degrees right awaty in the morning even in the winter here in Minne- so- cold!

    MT

    Block heater
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search

    A typical block heater cord.A block heater is an electric heater that heats the engine of a car to ease starting in cold weather. They are connected to normal AC power overnight or before driving, via regular power plugs that are fed through a vehicle's grille. This allows easier starting in cold temperatures, by keeping the coolant warm. Heaters are also available for motor oil so that warm oil can quickly circulate and warm the engine during startup. The rapid heat circulation caused by block heaters also aids the initial vaporization of fuel in the engine; because of this effect, block heaters reduce pollution, as poor fuel vaporization causes much higher emissions.

    Research by the Agricultural Engineering Department of the University of Saskatchewan in Canada has shown that operating a block heater for longer than four hours prior to starting a vehicle is a waste of energy. It was found that coolant temperature increased by almost 20 Celsius degrees in that period, regardless of the initial temperature (4 tests were run at ambient temperatures ranging from -11 to -29 degrees); continued use of the heater for a further one or two, or more, hours achieved a mere 2 or 3 more degrees as conditions stabilized. Engine oil temperature was found to increase over these periods by just 5 Celsius degrees.[1]

    Block heaters are widely used in many northern U.S. states, and are very common in regions with colder climates like Canada and Scandinavia. In colder climates block heaters are often standard equipment in new vehicles. In extremely cold climates, electrical outlets are sometimes found in public or private parking lots, especially in multi-storey car parks. Some parking lots cycle the power on for 20 minutes and off for 20 minutes, in order to reduce electricity costs.

    Block heaters are usually inserted into a freeze plug manufacturing hole in the cylinder block, heating the metal, coolant and oil. These can be installed at the factory, or by any qualified automotive service center. A block heater can even be installed by the handy do-it-yourselfer. Another variation is an in-line heater, connected to a coolant hose.

    There are many alternatives to a block heater that have some of the same benefits. A particularly simple option is to buy an after market heater that is attached to the oil pan, sometimes with magnets. Also, one can even get a heated dipstick. Another alternative to block heaters is a battery warmer, which keeps just the battery warm. This maintains the efficiency of the battery, which is highly dependent on temperature, and is cheaper than heating the entire engine block. Heated blankets are available for the entire engine area, as well. A standard timer switch can be used with any of these heaters, so that it does not have to be left on all the time. This can help lower the electrical costs of owning and using a block heater.

    Andrew Freeman, a North Dakotan, invented the headbolt heater in 1947 and received a patent for it on November 8, 1949.[2] Before the block heater was invented, people utilized various means of warming engines before starting them, such as pouring hot water on the engine block or draining the engine's oil for storage inside overnight. Some even shoveled hot coals underneath their vehicle's engine to achieve the same effect.

    During the dawn of aviation in pre-war Northern Canada, aviators flew with flight engineers who were responsible for preparing the radial engines for shutdown and startup in order to mitigate the effects of sub-zero temperatures. The flight engineer was responsible for draining the oil into buckets at night, and pre-heating both the engine and the buckets of oil using a blanket wrapped around the engine and a device known as a blow pot, essentially, a kerosene jet-heater used several hours prior to flight.[3]

    Some cars, such as the second generation Toyota Prius pump hot coolant from the cooling system into a 3 litre insulated thermos-style reservoir at shutdown, where it stays warm for up to 3 days.[4]

    [edit] References
    1.^ http://www.hydro.mb.ca/your_home/home_comfort/block_heaters.pdf
    2.^ Dakota Datebook
    3.^ Harbour Publishing - Bent Props & Blow Pots
    4.^ In praise of the lowly block heater
     
  5. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    [​IMG]

    Day to night in 10 minutes as a storm rolls in over SB I35 just south of downtown Minneapolis.
     
  6. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    Added 4 tanks

    535 mi- 16.7 gal= 32 mpg

    458.6- 13.96= 32.8 mpg

    457- 15= 30.1

    504.8- 15.19= 33.2

    Time for a break from the daily grind, going up to fishin' camp for next week! :)

    [​IMG]

    35W leaving Minneapolis
     
  7. mcmurphy

    mcmurphy Active Member

    So where would you buy an engine block heater? Is this something that would be a standard item in any auto parts store? Is there a benefit to using it year round or just whenever the temperature is below a set value
     
  8. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    I am not sure, you could try a parts store, or look on line. there might be a benifit if you have a short commute and your engine doesnt warm up all the way otherwise. it would then bring up your mpg quite a bit.
     
  9. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

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    Last edited: Dec 4, 2010
  10. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

  11. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

  12. PaleMelanesian

    PaleMelanesian Beat the System Staff Member

    Great shots! I especially like the one at the dock next to the big rig.

    That truck is amazingly clean and straight and shiny and dent-free. How do you manage that?!
     
  13. Nevyn

    Nevyn Well-Known Member

    By hypermiling. :cool::p:p:p:D
     
  14. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    Thanks guys!
    part luck, part skill, and perhaps some help from above? :D
    just keepin it between the lines! up to 170,000 miles, just broken in! :)
     
  15. waverunner

    waverunner New Member

    nice! amazing how many packages you can fit in there...
     
  16. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    thanks for the comments! well, it survived another winter, no dents yet! that could change this summer as I am into storm spotting now and might find some hail stones, eeek!
    getting close to 200,000 miles too :)
     
  17. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    a couple of shots ice driving

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  18. FSUspectra

    FSUspectra Practicing true conservatism!

    Storm spotting for fun, to sell pictures, or for work? I wish I could be out there, but alas, my still incomplete thesis is keeping me here! :p
     
  19. MT bucket

    MT bucket I want my MPG!

    Mostly a hobby, plus I do like to take pics, just learned how to do lightning pics, not for $$ though. plus it is good to have people to spot since radar cannot detect everything, so if we see something severe we can call and report it. They have free classes to learn what to look for and what to report, and what not too....
     
  20. FSUspectra

    FSUspectra Practicing true conservatism!

    Yeah, I'm a certified storm spotter (and a bachelor's in meteorology, going on masters) down here, but there isn't much to spot with all these trees! :p I mainly call in damage reports for my area, and go chasing every once in a while. Haven't actually seen a tornado yet though...

    Arkansas was the place to be today... Vilonia, AK took a really hard hit, reports coming in of pavement ripped up, vast devestation... most of the town is literally gone. :ccry: And it's not even over, with more watches and warnings popping up.
     

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