Comments needed on draft response to AAA press release

Discussion in 'Website news & discussions' started by lightfoot, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. lightfoot

    lightfoot Reformed speeder

    Here is a second draft of a response to the AAA's "hypermiling is dangerous" press release last week. Please indicate what you think should be added or removed and I will try to incorporate your suggestions. Tried to strike a balance between discrediting the AAA (why bother, they're doing a great job of it by themselves?) and sounding high-handed. And keep it as short as possible.

    AAA requested a point-by-point response by e-mail (which they might bury and/or quote out of context) so maybe it's better to post this here as a press release and refer AAA and others to it? Maybe issue it to the AP?

    DRAFT 2:

    "The skyrocketing price of gas has put our country into a serious predicament. The US's fleet of vehicles is not fuel efficient. In the long term these will be replaced by more efficient vehicles, but in the short term we need other solutions. A promising short- AND long- term solution is to improve driving habits in ways that will reduce fuel consumption.

    For the past three years, a group of people have been assembling and fine-tuning safe methods drivers can use to reduce fuel consumption in existing vehicles by 10-40%, sometimes more. These "Hypermiling" techniques (a term coined by the group’s originator Wayne Gerdes) have been described and discussed on a website, cleanmpg.com . Because it is run by the originator of the term, the cleanmpg website essentially defines Hypermiling methods. Some of these methods are old, others are quite new, taking advantage of recent developments in automotive technology.

    Hypermiling is a “toolbox” of techniques from which a driver selects methods that s/he feels are both safe and efficient, factoring in vehicle, driver, and situation. It is stressed that new drivers should add only one new method at a time, if necessary testing at low speeds in an empty parking lot or deserted back road, and should not try anything they feel will be unsafe. In hypermiling, the driver exercises the same discretion required in all driving. Going 65mph may be deemed “safe” on a highway with a 65mph limit, but not in a mall parking lot, or for that matter on the same highway in rain or snow.

    On June 27, 2008, the AAA issued a hysterical press release claiming that hypermilers are endangering themselves and others by using a variety of "extreme" methods. Some of the methods listed in the release are not even described on the cleanmpg website, others are not recommended because they are felt to be too dangerous, and others are simply misunderstood by the AAA. A cleanmpg member spoke with the AAA's VP for Public Affairs two days before the release was issued. This gentleman promised that this member's comments would be incorporated into the release, and that the AAA would contact Mr. Gerdes as well. Regrettably, neither happened.

    The AAA’s concerns included:

    (1) Rolling through stop signs and red lights to save fuel. We’re not sure where this came from but certainly not from cleanmpg.com . Recommending against it seemed superfluous, but perhaps a section explaining that this is not an acceptable Hypermiling technique should be added to the site.

    (2) Using oil thinner than the manufacturer recommends. This has never been recommended on cleanmpg. The site specifically recommends using a synthetic oil in the thinnest grade approved by the manufacturer.

    (3) Drafting  – cleanmpg specifically recommends against drafting on safety grounds alone. In addition, it is more efficient to slow down than it is to draft a semi at typical truck speeds. The AAA’s accusation is especially perplexing because drafting  is basically tailgating. The only difference is that drafting is done in an attempt to improve fuel economy, whereas tailgating is intended to intimidate the leading driver into pulling over or speeding up. Tailgating is endemic on our highways: a large percentage of drivers follows far closer than recommended. Trucks get within one CAR length of a car, apparently assuming that because they can see over the car they can anticipate what will happen, and cars tailgate trucks because they assume they can stop faster than the truck (debatable). This is a grave safety issue that AAA is not addressing.

    (4) Inflating tires. AAA incorrectly calls it “overinflating” when tires are put at the maximum pressure recommended by the tire manufacturer. This is within spec, not “over”: a large safety margin is built into the tire manufacturer’s recommendation. Inflating to the sidewall rating is recommended by police for their own cruisers for improved wet and dry grip ( http://www.officer.com/web/online/Editorial-and-Features/Driving-Under-Pressure/19$27281 ). An SAE study has verified this improvement in grip, and also documents that evenness of wear is not affected ( http://www.geocities.com/barrystiretech/sae800087synopsis.html ). Fuel economy is improved, by as much as 10% in my testing, and tire life is extended. The tradeoff is slightly harsher ride and possibly more tire noise, but one quickly becomes used to this.

    Over the past few years, reporters from respected institutions such as CBS, ABC, Dan Rather reports, and other regional and local video and print news outlets have gone on "ride-alongs" with various cleanmpg members to experience hypermiling firsthand. None of them stated in their reports that they found the methods used hazardous {am I correct here? I can't remember any who did?}

    It would benefit our nation if the AAA would become a partner rather than an opponent in our grass-roots effort to develop and implement a solution to this serious predicament that faces our nation. We invite the AAA to do so."

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Chuck

    Chuck just the messenger

    Excellent John!

    Only think I might add is to point out tailgating is essentiall drafting and it occurs countless times daily.
     
  3. bestmapman

    bestmapman Fighting untruth and misinformation

    Good article. My only comment is that the first sentence or two should be the summary of what you want to communicate. Almost like an mini abstract.

    I think what you want to communicate is that AAA is wrong about hypermiling as recommended by CleanMPG. Here is the recommendated first sentences.

    AAA is completely wrong on some aspects of hypermiling. Your recent press release has many misquotes and wrong procedures. I have detailed what is wrong with the press release and AAA should issue a correction and be more diligent in the future. Many people including myself have looked to AAA as the source and information and expertise. I would be dissapointing if that perception would change for myself and the general public.
     
  4. laurieaw

    laurieaw Sorceress of the North

    i don't see enough or any mention of going the speed limit and keeping to the right. should be an obvious suggestion.
     
  5. fixedintime

    fixedintime Well-Known Member

    A few comments -

    1. I think you lose on this one "On June 27, 2008, the AAA issued a hysterical press release claiming that hypermilers are endangering themselves and others by using a variety of "extreme" methods."

    Better to say "On ... issued a press release expressing their view that hypermiles......."

    Using the term "hysterical" will only sound like you are the one who is hysterical.

    2. Under (3) you say "whereas tailgating is intended to intimidate the leading driver" I would not claim that it is always done to intimidate. I would prefer to say that it is done either out of ignorance of the dangers involved however it is also used, unfortunately, to intimidate.

    3. I think as a conclusion you might add that much has been made of the fact that people are cutting back on their driving due to the increased cost of gas. The numbers usually cited is only a couple of percentage points. (It would be good to have the real numbers here, with a citation.) If we can just educate people to slow down to the speed limit and follow a few other of the relatively simple fuel saving measures discussed at cleanmpg.com we could cut gas consumption in this county by over 10%. That has the potential to have a huge impact on the cost of gas and our dependence or foreign soures for our oil.

    And lastly pat the AAA on the back for the good suggestions they have and point out that they are the same one recommenced at cleanmpg.com. That way you sound more cooperative than argumentative. You may even want to sound like you and the AAA are really in agreement on many of the issues, but that they are wrong in labeling the bad issues as hypermiler suggestions and blaming the hypermilers for doing them. That in reality most drivers are doing them (drafting/tailgating). Then you sound like the nice guy and can bring up the areas where the AAA is wrong or uninformed.
     
  6. lightfoot

    lightfoot Reformed speeder

    Thanks for all the help. I tried to incorporate almost everything and rearranged it into a better format. Here is DRAFT #3:

    CLEANMPG
    June 30, 2008:
    RESPONSE TO AAA'S 6/27/2008 "HYPERMILING IS DANGEROUS" PRESS RELEASE

    On June 27, 2008, the AAA issued a press release claiming that "hypermilers" are endangering themselves and others by using a variety of "extreme" methods. Unfortunately, the release was not well researched and is rife with misstatements. This statement is an effort to correct these errors.

    For the past three years, a group of people has been developing and fine-tuning safe methods drivers can use to reduce fuel consumption in existing vehicles by 10-40% or more. These "hypermiling" techniques (a term coined by the group’s originator Wayne Gerdes) are described and discussed on the website cleanmpg.com .  Because it is run by the originator of the term, CleanMPG effectively defines hypermiling methods. Some of these methods are old, dating back to fuel rationing during WWII, others are quite new, taking advantage of recent advances in automotive technology.

    Hypermiling is a “toolbox” from which a driver selects methods that s/he feels are both safe and efficient, factoring in vehicle, driver, and situation. CleanMPG stresses that beginning hypermilers should add only one new method at a time, if necessary testing at low speeds in an empty parking lot or deserted back road, and should never try anything they feel will be unsafe. In hypermiling, the driver exercises the same discretion required in all driving. Going 65mph may be deemed “safe” on a highway with a 65mph limit, but not in a mall parking lot, or for that matter on the same highway in rain or snow. Hypermilers drive more safely than today's average US driver because (a) they drive at or below posted speed limits, (b) they focus intently on the road and traffic conditions around them, and (c) they keep to the right.

    Some the AAA's recommendations are listed on CleanMPG as a good starting point: smooth and easy acceleration and braking, maintaining a steady speed, using cruise control, and looking ahead to anticipate changing traffic conditions. Actually, cruise control is less efficient than other methods but it is an excellent tool to break the speeding habit.

    But other methods listed in the AAA release are not even described on the CleanMPG website, are not recommended because they are felt to be too dangerous, or are simply misunderstood by the AAA.  A senior CleanMPG member spoke with the AAA's VP for Public Affairs two days before the release was issued.  The VP promised that this member's comments would be incorporated into the release, and that the AAA would contact Mr. Gerdes as well.  Regrettably, neither happened.

    The AAA’s concerns included:

    (1) Rolling through stop signs and red lights to save fuel. We’re not sure where this came from but certainly not from CleanMPG . Recommending against it seemed superfluous. Perhaps a section explaining that this is not an acceptable hypermiling technique should be added to the site?

    (2) Using oil thinner than the grade recommended by the vehicle manufacturer has never been recommended on CleanMPG. The site specifically recommends using a synthetic oil in the thinnest grade approved by the manufacturer.

    (3) Drafting – CleanMPG specifically recommends against drafting on safety grounds alone. In addition, it is more efficient to slow down than it is to draft a semi at typical truck speeds. The AAA’s accusation is especially perplexing because drafting is basically tailgating. The only difference is that drafting is done in an attempt to improve fuel economy, whereas tailgating is done out of ignorance or inattention, or to intimidate the leading driver into moving over or speeding up. Tailgating is endemic on our highways: a large percentage of drivers follows much closer than recommended. Trucks close within one CAR length of a car, apparently assuming that because they can see over the car they can anticipate what will happen, and cars tailgate trucks because they assume they can stop faster than the truck (debatable). This is a grave safety issue that AAA is not addressing.

    (4) Inflating tires. The AAA incorrectly calls it “over inflating” when tires are put at the maximum pressure recommended on the sidewalls by the tire manufacturer. This is within spec, not “over” as a large safety margin is built into the tire manufacturer’s recommendation. Inflating to the sidewall rating is recommended by police for their own cruisers for improved wet and dry grip ( http://www.officer.com/web/online/Editorial-and-Features/Driving-Under-Pressure/19$27281 ). An SAE study verifies this improvement in grip and also documents that evenness of wear is not affected ( http://www.geocities.com/barrystiretech/sae800087synopsis.html ). Fuel economy is improved, by as much as 10% in testing, and tire life is extended. The tradeoffs are slightly harsher ride and possibly more tire noise, but one quickly becomes accustomed to this.

    (5) Coasting. Gliding engine-on in neutral is a safe and effective practice if one is comfortable with it and does it only in safe locations. Gliding engine-off is possible only in certain specific types of cars and only as an advanced method. Hybrids coast engine-off automatically and this is deemed safe. If there is following traffic, gliding is done in a way which minimizes variations in speed - or not done at all. All of this is described in detail at CleanMPG.

    Over the past few years, reporters from respected institutions such as CBS, ABC, Dan Rather reports, and other regional and local news outlets have gone on "ride-alongs" with various CleanMPG members to experience hypermiling firsthand.  None of them stated either in person or in their reports that they found the methods hazardous.

    The skyrocketing price of gas has put our country into a serious predicament. The United States' fleet of vehicles is not fuel-efficient. In the long term, more efficient vehicles will replace these, but we need to implement other solutions sooner than that. A promising short- and long- term solution is to improve driving habits in ways that will reduce fuel consumption significantly. It would benefit our nation if the AAA would become an ally rather than an opponent in CleanMPG's grass-roots efforts. We invite the AAA to do so. Many people look to the AAA as a source for information and expertise and it would be disappointing if that perception were to change.

    The Members of CleanMPG

    Any other thoughts?
     
  7. lightfoot

    lightfoot Reformed speeder

    For reference, here is the AAA's press release. I couldn't find it on their site so I lifted it from another place. Hopefully it is complete. I should have posted it earlier, sorry:

    AAA Advises Hypermilers to Avoid Dangerous Fuel-Saving Techniques
    Keep safety first by avoiding techniques that endanger motorists and harm vehicles

    ORLANDO, Fla., June 27 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As record-high fuel prices continue to stress household budgets, many motorists are looking for ways to improve their vehicle's fuel economy -- sometimes to the point of putting their lives in danger. AAA advises motorists to think of safety first, refraining from fuel-saving techniques that could put themselves and others in danger and avoid practices that could harm their vehicles.
    Some motorists have gone to extreme measures to conserve fuel while driving by 'hypermiling' -- trying to exceed the EPA estimated fuel efficiency of a vehicle by drastically modifying driving and maintenance habits
    "The goals of hypermiling are positive, such as eliminating aggressive driving and saving energy," said Marshall L. Doney, AAA Automotive vice president. "Unfortunately some motorists have taken their desire to improve fuel economy to extremes with techniques that put themselves, as well as their fellow motorists, in danger."
    Examples of the dangerous hypermiling techniques include cutting off the vehicle's engine or putting it in neutral to coast on a roadway, tailgating or drafting larger vehicles, rolling through stop signs and driving at erratic and unsafe speeds. "These practices can put motorists in a treacherous situation where they could lose power steering and brakes or be unable to react to quickly changing traffic conditions," Doney said.
    "Not only are these extreme driving behaviors dangerous, many of them also are illegal. However, there are several safe and legal driving techniques motorists can implement to conserve fuel, such as smooth and easy acceleration and braking, maintaining a steady speed, using cruise control and looking ahead to anticipate changing traffic conditions," he said.
    Hypermiling techniques are not limited to driving style. How motorists maintain their vehicles is also key in reaching optimal fuel economy, but extreme measures can be harmful to a vehicle.
    Keeping tires properly inflated can improve fuel economy by two to three percent, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. However, some drivers have taken this advice too far by over-inflating their tires, which the Rubber Manufacturers Association reports can make them more susceptible to road hazard damage and result in premature wear to the center portion of the tread. Over-inflation can also cause handling issues due to less tire surface making contact with the road.
    Using the recommended grade of motor oil is also helpful in improving fuel economy. However, some hypermilers opt to use the lowest 'weight' motor oil (or that with the lowest kinematic viscosity) on the market. However, motor oil is not a fluid that can be freely interchanged and using too light of oil can cause major damage to a vehicle's engine.
    In both instances, AAA's auto maintenance experts recommend motorists check their owner's manual for the manufacturer's recommendations. Tires should only be inflated to the pressures specified by the vehicle manufacturer -- and not what is listed on the sidewall of the tire. Motorists also should use the lowest grade motor oil recommended by the manufacturer for their climate.
    For assistance with vehicle maintenance, AAA offers a listing of Approved Auto Repair facilities it has certified for meeting and maintaining high professional standards. To locate AAA Approved Auto Repair facilities nearby, visit the Automotive page on AAA.com.

    As North America's largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 51 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at www.AAA.com.

    (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20080226/DC15031LOGO )

    Available Topic Expert(s): For information on the listed expert(s), click appropriate link.
    Christie Hyde
     
  8. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi John:

    ___I think it needs a little more teeth and include the speeding and Close-in drafting as we all see it day in and day out. I will include a pic but I think its time for me to do a study from the Lake Forest O’asis over top of I-94.

    ___I spoke with PRNewswire this morning and a release like this through them is cost prohibitive imho. $195 for the subscription and $680 for 400 words to upload a national press release :( :ccry: At least we know what the AAA is wasting their money on.

    ___I will be creating a media forum in just a few minutes and will link it from the home page in two different locations. In that forum, they will be led directly to this finalized draft and we can let the public know the truth vs. the crap the AAA posted. I think we ruffled their feathers and it is time to press the point.

    ___Good Luck

    ___Wayne
     
  9. JimboK

    JimboK One owner, low mileage

    I would offer a demo to key AAA staff/officers:

    "To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of hypermiling techniques, we invite you or any AAA official to experience them first hand. We will be glad to try to put you in touch with an experienced hypermiler in your area for a hands-on demonstration."
     
  10. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    CLEANMPG
    June 30, 2008:
    RESPONSE TO AAA'S 6/27/2008 "Hypermiling IS DANGEROUS" PRESS RELEASE

    On June 27, 2008, the AAA issued a press release claiming that "hypermilers" are endangering themselves and others by using a variety of "extreme" methods. Unfortunately, the release was not well researched and is rife with misstatements. This statement is an effort to correct these errors.

    For the past three years, a group of people has been developing and fine-tuning safe methods drivers can use to reduce fuel consumption in existing vehicles by 20 to 100% or more. These "hypermiling" techniques (a term coined by the group’s originator Wayne Gerdes) are described and discussed on the website cleanmpg.com. Because it is run by the originator of the term, CleanMPG effectively defines Hypermiling methods. Some of these methods are old, dating back to fuel rationing during WWII, others are quite new, taking advantage of recent advances in automotive technology.

    Hypermiling is a “toolbox” from which a driver selects methods that s/he feels are both safe and efficient, factoring in vehicle, driver, and situation. CleanMPG stresses that beginning hypermilers should add only one new method at a time, if necessary testing at low speeds in an empty parking lot or deserted back road, and should never try anything they feel will be unsafe. In Hypermiling , the driver exercises the same discretion required in all driving. Going 65mph may be deemed “safe” on a highway with a 65mph limit, but not in a mall parking lot, or for that matter on the same highway in rain or snow. Hypermilers drive more safely than today's average US driver because (a) they do not drive at speeds above the posted speed limits, (b) they focus intently on the road and traffic conditions around them, and (c) they keep to the right hand lane.

    Some the AAA's recommendations are listed on CleanMPG as a good starting point: smooth and easy acceleration and braking, maintaining a steady speed, using cruise control, and looking ahead to anticipate changing traffic conditions. Actually, cruise control is less efficient than other methods but it is an excellent tool to break the speeding habit.

    But other methods listed in the AAA release are not even described on the CleanMPG website, are not recommended because they are felt to be too dangerous, or are misunderstood by the AAA. A senior CleanMPG member spoke with the AAA's VP for Public Affairs two days before the release was issued. The VP promised that this member's comments would be incorporated into the release, and that the AAA would contact Mr. Gerdes as well. Regrettably, neither happened.

    The AAA’s concerns included:

    (1) Rolling through stop signs and red lights to save fuel. We’re not sure where this came from but certainly not from CleanMPG. Recommending against it seemed superfluous as rolling through stop signs and red lights has been a law on the books for literally 100 years.

    (2) Using oil thinner than the grade recommended by the vehicle manufacturer has never been recommended on CleanMPG. The site specifically recommends using a synthetic oil in the thinnest grade approved by the manufacturer.

    (3) Drafting – CleanMPG specifically recommends against Close-in or NASCAR like drafting on safety grounds alone. In addition, it is more efficient to slow down than it is to draft a semi at typical truck speeds. The AAA’s accusation is especially perplexing because drafting is basically tailgating. The only difference is that drafting is done in an attempt to improve fuel economy, whereas tailgating is done out of ignorance or inattention, or to intimidate the leading driver into moving over or speeding up. Tailgating is endemic on our highways: a large percentage of drivers follows much closer than recommended. Trucks close within one CAR length of a car, apparently assuming that because they can see over the car they can anticipate what will happen, and cars tailgate trucks because they assume they can stop faster than the truck (debatable). This is a grave safety issue that AAA is not addressing.

    [​IMG]
    Chicago’s I-94 - 45 mph Construction Zone as seen on June 20th, 2008. Average speeds are between
    55 and 60 mph and every car on the road for as far as the eye can see is within 1 second following
    distances. Typical of a morning and afternoon commute in Chicago and every other major cities
    thoroughfare in the US.​

    (4) Inflating tires. The AAA incorrectly calls it “over inflating” when tires are put at the maximum pressure recommended on the sidewalls by the tire manufacturer. This is within spec, not “over” as a large safety margin is built into the tire manufacturer’s recommendation. Inflating to the sidewall rating is recommended by police for their own cruisers for improved wet and dry grip (http://www.officer.com/web/online/Editorial-and-Features/Driving-Under-Pressure/19$27281). An SAE study verifies this improvement in grip and also documents that evenness of wear is not affected (http://www.geocities.com/barrystiret...7synopsis.html). Fuel economy is improved, by as much as 10% in testing, and tire life is extended by upwards of 200%. The tradeoffs are slightly harsher ride and possibly more tire noise, but one quickly becomes accustomed to this.

    (5) Coasting. Gliding engine-on in neutral is a safe and effective practice if one is comfortable with it and does it only in safe locations. Gliding engine-off is possible only in certain specific types of cars and only as an advanced method. Hybrids coast engine-off automatically and this is deemed safe. If there is following traffic, gliding is done in a way which minimizes variations in speed - or not done at all. All of this is described in detail at CleanMPG.

    Over the past few years, reporters from respected institutions such as CBS, ABC, Dan Rather reports, and other regional and local news outlets have gone on "ride-a-longs" or Hypermiling Clinics with various CleanMPG members to experience Hypermiling firsthand. None of them stated either in person or in their reports that they found the methods hazardous but all have seen their respective fuel economy increase by as much as 100%!

    The skyrocketing price of gas has put our country into a serious predicament. The United States' fleet of vehicles is not fuel-efficient. In the long term, more efficient vehicles will replace these, but we need to implement other solutions sooner than that. A promising short- and long- term solution is to improve driving habits in ways that will reduce fuel consumption significantly. It would benefit our nation if the AAA would become an ally rather than an opponent in CleanMPG's grass-roots efforts and we invite the AAA to do so. Many people look to the AAA as a source for information and expertise and it would be disappointing if that perception were to change.

    Our concerns with AAA’s press release is they singled out practices that hypermilers would never condone or promote yet did not advise against what most experience on the road daily. That is tailgaters that appear in the right hand lanes while driving legally, blatant beyond the speed limit driving by the public at large and close-in drafting by the public without any idea that they themselves are involved in the practice.

    With the AAA’s lack of credible experts and poor fuel economy saving practices currently endorsed by the organization, we encourage them to become much better educated for both the consumers they serve as well as themselves vs. what they have pronounced to date.

    Attempts to contact the AAA offering their management driving clinics by fuel economy experts experienced in the field of hypermiling have failed to produce a response.

    Members of CleanMPG
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2008
  11. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi All:

    ___I added some more changes so let us know what you think?

    ___Good Luck

    ___Wayne
     
  12. Right Lane Cruiser

    Right Lane Cruiser Penguin of Notagascar

    Wayne, it should read thusly: "Our concern with AAA’s press release is they singled out practices that hypermilers would never condone or promote"

    The double negative undoes what you are trying to say in that sentence...
     
  13. fixedintime

    fixedintime Well-Known Member

    I like the rewrite.

    I think also that the various AAA offices are putting out their own version of the press release. At least the one I found at the AAA mid-atlantic site is different than the one posted here.

    See here. The link doesn't quite work as I expected the way they have their website set up. Go to the link, click on Washington Metro Area, then click on the hypermiler press release.

    They have added a new one I had not heard anywhere "Taking ‘short cuts’ through business parking lots to avoid sitting at red lights." I have not know of this from anyone other than those I see as aggressive drivers. I have never seen it here.

    My other disappointment in this press release is that in their list of do they did not think to mention just slowing down to the speed limit. Given the speed people go this could be the biggest gas saver for most drivers.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2008
  14. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Sean:

    ___Got it.

    ___Fixedintime, I use off-peak arterials, subdivision separators and Business Parks as alternates to avoid major roadways and arterials given there is so much less traffic in them let alone less traffic lights. Why would you want to stay on a higher speed roadway with much more traffic and traffic lights than a lesser traveled roadway without? Your safety is far higher on an alternate than the major roadway let alone wanting to drive on a stop light infested route vs. one that is not?

    ___In my comment to Christie of the AAA, this feels like a coordinated attack and paid for by someone who loves to keep the status quo rolling? It certainly is not about safety or we would have seen the condemnation of what is really happening on today’s roadways vs. the unintelligible garbage the AAA put out the other day.

    ___Maybe a better way to promote Hypermiling is to place the 3-month challenge numbers at a % above the EPA on the home page :)

    ___Good Luck

    ___Wayne
     
  15. WriConsult

    WriConsult Super Moderator

    Looks great so far. I'd be happy to sign my name to that.

    Only thing I could think to add is that hypermilers are probably much safer then typical drivers because they always stay within the speed limit and tend to be much more alert.
     
  16. WriConsult

    WriConsult Super Moderator

    Boy, that is a really puzzling one. It's pretty rare that you'd save fuel by threading your way through a parking lot, something that often WASTES a lot of fuel. And to avoid a red light? Huh? Any red light long enough to matter, and we're killing the engine anyway.
     
  17. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi Dan:

    ___I am thinking about creating a separate html page just for this release and linking both the definition of hypermiling and a Media “Contact us” E-Mail address. That should cover the more aware driving aspect but do you think I should include the link or write it in the body of the response?

    ___Good Luck

    ___Wayne
     
  18. lightfoot

    lightfoot Reformed speeder

    I tried to work that in but apparently it needs more emphasis?

    excel, I assume you mean you take the streets through business parks, correct? If so it might be good to say "the streets through business parks" to negate their implication that we drive through the parking lots? A street is a street, after all.
     
  19. xcel

    xcel PZEV, there's nothing like it :) Staff Member

    Hi John:

    ___I wasn't even going to include that in the write-up you did as it is getting a little detailed for most I believe?

    ___Good Luck

    ___Wayne
     
  20. lightfoot

    lightfoot Reformed speeder

    Yes I agree. I was struggling to keep it as straightforward as possible. Explaining HM-ing quickly gets complicated.
     

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